Arrays

Arrays - Arrays Arrays COP3014 Arrays Arrays Introduction

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Arrays Arrays COP3014  
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Arrays Arrays Introduction An array is a data structure comprised of a consecutive  group of memory locations that all have the same name  and same type Arrays are static entities in that they remain the same size  during program execution Array elements are referenced by their relative position  number The first element always starts with zero.  To refer to a particular location, or element, in an array,  specify the name of the array and the position number of  the element in the array 
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// Example of an array of integers // with 10 elements numbered 0 through 9. int c [10]; c[0] = -45; c[1] = 5; c[2] = 6 c[3] = 34; c[4] = 9; c[5] = 10; c[6] = 11; c[7] = 12; c[8] = 87; c[9] = 100;
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What it looks like in  What it looks like in  memory memory -45 5 6 34 9 10 11 12 87 100 c[0] c[1] c[2] c[3] c[4] c[5] c[6] c[7] c[8] c[9]
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Arrays are your first introduction to a  concept in programming called Pointers Pointers are variables that, instead of  containing a value, contain the address of  where the value exists An array variable is a Pointer to the  beginning address where the array  begins.  Example:  C[0] says that go to the array “C” and start  with the offset of zero (0). 
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Declaring Arrays Declaring Arrays Declaring an array and allocating memory  at the same time:  // Declare an array called “score” that // will hold 5 integers. int score[5]; Declaring an array and allocating  memory at the same time using a  constant to define the size:  // Declare an array called “score” that // will hold Maxsize integers. // This is the recommended practice. // Maxsize is used throughout the program // to control the array. Changes to the // array size need only be done in one // place const int Maxsize=5 int score[Maxsize];
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Declaring Arrays Declaring Arrays Declaring an array of unknown size and  allocating memory during execution // Declare an array called “score” that // that does not have a size. // Initially it just holds an address // without a value (null) const int Maxsize=5; int * score; //score will hold // an address now. // The following goes to the // operating system and gets 5 integer // spaces in memory and gives the // beginning address to score score = new int[Maxsize];
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Accessing Arrays Accessing Arrays You access an individual component of  an array using the square [] brackets as a  subscript cout << count[X] << count[X=1]<<endl; Note there are two uses of square  brackets In declaring the array size Everywhere else the subscript is used Subscript can  be any discrete integer  value int x=1; cout << count[1+1]; count << count [X+1]; count << count [ count[x]];      
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Initializing an Array Initializing an Array
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course COP 3014 taught by Professor Tyson during the Fall '10 term at FSU.

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Arrays - Arrays Arrays COP3014 Arrays Arrays Introduction

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