Development Economics Annals_of_Advanced_Biomedical_Sciences_S.pdf - Annals of Advanced Biomedical Sciences Social Return to Education Empirical Study

Development Economics Annals_of_Advanced_Biomedical_Sciences_S.pdf

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Annals of Advanced Biomedical Sciences Social Return to Education: Empirical Study from Dhofar Region in Oman Ann Adv Biomed Sci Social Return to Education: Empirical Study from Dhofar Region in Oman Hussein MA 1 * and Sid Ahmed HM 2 1 College of Commerce and Business Administration Dhofar University Salalah, Sultanate of Oman 2 Department of IBA Salalah College of Applied Sciences, Sultanate of Oman *Corresponding author: Dr. Muawya Ahmed Hussein, Dhofar University College of Commerce and Business Administration Salalah, Sultanate of Oman, Email: [email protected] Abstract A model was developed in this paper to examine the effect of wife and husbands' education, mother age, age at first marriage and child mortality on fertility among women in Dhofar Region, Oman. Econometric techniques are applied to examine social returns to female education. Descriptive statistics and ordinary least squares (OLS) methods are used for data analysis. The results suggest that mother’s education, child mortality, mother’s age and age at first marriage are important factors in determining the fe rtility level. Mother’s education, particularly secondary and university education, are found to have a significant negative impact on fertility, whereas child mortality, mother’s age and age at first marriage have significant positive impact on fertility. Keywords: Oman; Dhofar Region ; Fertility; Parental Education; Age; Age at First Marriage; Child Mortality Introduction The future population size and age structure of any country depends basically on three demographic components: fertility, mortality and net international migration. Therefore, fertility is becoming one of the possible ways of retarding or reversing demographic ageing. A reversal of declines of fertility would lead the age structure of the population back towards a younger one, thus slowing down the ageing process. However, the recent experience of low-fertility countries suggests that there is no reason to assume that their fertility will return anytime soon to the above-replacement level [1,2]. Unlike these countries, in the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (GCC), the rates of fertility and population growth are very high compared to world rate. This may be attributed to cultural factors that encourage high fertility, the spread of costs and benefits of children beyond the nuclear family to the extended family and the society at large and also due to immigration. Population of the GCC countries has jumped from about 14 million in 1980 to about 44 million in 2012 [3]. The population growth between 2005 and 2010 are averaged at 7.6%, with figures ranging between 15.1% in Qatar to about 2% in Saudi Arabia and Oman. In early 80s, fertility rates, which measure births per woman, were quite high. For example, the average Omani woman gave birth to an extraordinary 8.32 children over her fertile years, and in Saudi Arabia, the corresponding Research Article Volume 2 Issue 2 Received Date : February 23, 2019 Published Date: March 08, 2019
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Annals of Advanced Biomedical Sciences Hussein MA and Sid Ahmed HM. Social Return to Education: Empirical Study
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