MAE 101 homework 6 sol

MAE 101 homework 6 sol - Universal Joint Two shafts AC and...

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Universal Joint Two shafts AC and ED , which lie in the vertical yz plane, are connected by a universal joint at D . The bearings at B and E do not exert any axial force. A couple of magnitude 30 N-m (clockwise when viewed from positive z axis) is applied to the shaft AC at A . At a time when the arm of the crosspiece attached to the shaft AC is vertical determine (a) the magnitude of the couple M G which must be applied to shaft EG to maintain equilibrium, (b) the reaction at B , C and E . (Hint: The sum of the couples exerted on the crosspiece must be zero) Solution It helps to first decide how to categorize the structure. Because it has supports, it resembles the definition of a frame. However, the structure also has moving parts (i.e., there is enough freedom of motion such that the joint can swivel if you want it to) that transfer one load (the torque applied at A ) into another (the torque at G ). So it is really somewhere between a frame and a machine. At any rate, since there are supports, we want to begin by drawing a FBD of the structure as a whole, replacing the supports by equivalent reactions. The problem statement says that the bearings at B and E do not support axial loads. So we let the components of reaction force along the axes of the shafts be zero at
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course MAE 101 taught by Professor Orient during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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MAE 101 homework 6 sol - Universal Joint Two shafts AC and...

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