Chap 31 Fungi-st-1-09

Chap 31 Fungi-st-1-09 - What is a fungus? What is a fungus?...

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Unformatted text preview: What is a fungus? What is a fungus? Chap 31 Endophytes-fungi inside plant leaves, source of metabolites Evolution of the fungi Evolution of the fungi Choanoflagellate- flagellated protist Do not have cellulose, chitin [polysaccharide with nitrogen] nor cell wall Lateral gene transfer between actinobacteria and fungi, produces antibodies in fungi Though they are closer to animals, plants and fungi usually share a symbiotic nature Fungi closely related to the roots of plants- usually because they are wrapped around the plants- allow for absorption of water and minerals from the surrounding soil while plants provide sugar molecules to these land plants In fact about 95-96% of land plants are associated with fungi Podaxis pixillaris Only fungi found in deserts gaziza Near a salt lake- Coprinus plicatilis Hyphae Thin, hair-like structures Many come together to form mycelium These structures cause fungi to spread Hyphae elongate, surface area 1)Nectroph- kill the host first with enzymes [digest the host], hyphae invade the body of the host 2)Biotroph- obtain nutrients only from living cells 3)Hemibiotroph- enter the living host, then kill it Septa- extensions of the wall Have pores that help in cytoplasmic streaming Coenocytic- lack septa [nuclei divides, cell doesnt divide] Chitin does not lyse in high sugar [jams] Septates have pores within them that allow for cytoplasmic streaming During reproduction, have two different nuclei [ and +] Mycelium = body of the fungus Increases in length, increases surface area for absorption mycelium mycelium fruiting bodies fruiting bodies both are composed of hyphae What do fungi eat? Heterotrophs 1.Decomposers [saprobes] 2.Symbiotic [lichens- w/algae] 3.Predatory -fungi have enzymes that can digest lignin-saprophytic- get nutrients from dead organisms Nematode Hyphae How many fungal individuals? 1)Saprophytic fungi (Decomposer fungi)- fairy ring that is formed as fungi grow wider to eat organic materials which Increases the area it covers by decomposing dead trees or dead organic material within the soil 2)Symbiotic fungi...
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIL 160 taught by Professor Krempels during the Spring '08 term at University of Miami.

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Chap 31 Fungi-st-1-09 - What is a fungus? What is a fungus?...

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