Invertebrates-st-2011-1

Invertebrates-st-2011-1 - Invertebrates-Chap 33 All animals...

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Invertebrates-Chap 33 All animals are motile, either larval OR adult stage, don’t compete with each other for resources
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Overview: Life Without a Backbone Invertebrates Are animals that lack a backbone Account for 95% of known animal species Figure 33.1
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A summary of animal phyla Table 33.7
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Poriferans ---Sponges are suspension feeders/filter feeders ----Capturing food particles suspended in the water that passes through their body -asymmetrical -sessile [have molecules used for defense, Spongistatins] -cavity spongocoel, pores ostia Water movement ostia->spongocoel->osculum -have spicules [silica, calcium carbonate, protein] instead of skeletons, act as protection -mostly asexual reproduction by budding -basal animals Azure vase sponge (Callyspongia plicifera) Osculum Spicules Water flow Flagellum Collar Food particles in mucus Choanocyte Phagocytosis of food particles Amoebocyte Choanocytes. The spongocoel is lined with feeding cells called choanocytes. By beating flagella, the choanocytes create a current that draws water in through the porocytes. Spongocoel. Water passing through porocytes enters a cavity called the spongocoel. Porocytes. Water enters the epidermis through channels formed by porocytes, doughnut-shaped cells that span the body wall. Epidermis. The outer layer consists of tightly packed epidermal cells. Mesohyl. The wall of this simple sponge consists of two layers of cells separated by a gelatinous matrix, the mesohyl (“middle matter”). The movement of the choanocyte flagella also draws water through its collar of fingerlike projections. Food particles are trapped in the mucus coating the projections, engulfed by
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIL 160 taught by Professor Krempels during the Spring '08 term at University of Miami.

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Invertebrates-st-2011-1 - Invertebrates-Chap 33 All animals...

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