lecture - cha 9 -student

lecture - cha 9 -student - CHAPTER 9 Proteins and Their...

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CHAPTER 9 Proteins and Their Synthesis Copyright 2008 © W H Freeman and Company
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1. How are the sequences of a gene and its protein related? 2. Why is it said that the genetic code is nonoverlapping and degenerate? 3. What is the evidence that the ribosomal RNA, not the ribosomal proteins, carries out the key steps in translation? 4. What is posttranslational processing, and why is it important for protein function? Key Questions
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9.1 Protein Structure Protein: a polymer of amino acids. Peptide; polypeptide
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9.1 Protein Structure Protein: a polymer of amino acids. Peptide; polypeptide 20 amino acids Essential amino acids (8): Phenylalanine (Phe) Valine (Val) Threonine (Thr) Tryptophan (Trp) Isoleucine (Ile) Methionine (Met) Leucine (Leu) Lysine (Lys) For infants: Cysteine Tyrosine Histidine Arginine
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9.1 Protein Structure Protein: a polymer of amino acids. Peptide; polypeptide Levels of protein structure Globular proteins: enzymes and antibodies. - active site, domains. - can have tertiary & quaternary structure Fibrous proteins (linear shape): skin, hair, and tendons.
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9.2 Colinearity of Gene and Protein trpA Gene and protein sequences are colinear in E. coli Yanofsky 1963 16 mutations sites in the gene map = order of amino acids Position of gene mutations correlates with position of amino acids [linear sequence of nucleotides determines linear sequence of amino acids in a protein]
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9.3 The Genetic Code Overlapping versus nonoverlapping codes. Codon: a section of RNA that encodes a single amino acid. Code is non-overlapping (Tsugita, 1960), point mutations in TMV. Only a single amino acid changes at one time in one region of the protein when a substitution point mutation occurs. BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB If they overlapped, one point mutation could affect up to 3 amin acids
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9.3 The Genetic Code Number of letters in the codon. ---- >>>>> 3 Code is triplet (Brenner and Gamow, early 1960s):
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2011 for the course BIL 250 taught by Professor Wang during the Fall '08 term at University of Miami.

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lecture - cha 9 -student - CHAPTER 9 Proteins and Their...

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