Business analyst's view of sdlcmodels

Business analyst's view of sdlcmodels - Business analysts...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Business analyst’s view of software development life cycle models General Approach ................................................................................................... 1 Linear or Phased Approaches ................................................................................ 1 Waterfall .............................................................................................................. 1 V Model ............................................................................................................... 4 Incremental Development ................................................................................... 6 Iterative Approaches ............................................................................................... 8 Spiral .................................................................................................................. 8 Microsoft Solutions Framework ........................................................................ 11 Rationale Unified Process ................................................................................. 13 Agile Approaches .................................................................................................. 15 Rapid Application Development ........................................................................ 15 DSDM ................................................................................................................ 15 Extreme Programming ...................................................................................... 18 General Approach Regardless of the time an activity takes whether they are done simultaneously or in long planned phases fraught with documentation and approvals, the SDLC must answer certain questions about the product being developed. What is the business problem being solved? Concept phase. What is the solution to that problem? Requirements How are we going to affect the solution? Logical Design What are the elements of that solution? Physical design and coding How do we know our solution is right? Unit, integration and system testing How do we know we have the right solution? Acceptance testing Will it work in the environment with the actual users? Implementation Each of the life cycle models includes activities, tasks, or phases that answer these questions, although not necessarily in the direct format given above. Linear or Phased Approaches Waterfall While the Waterfall Model presents a straightforward view of the software life cycle, this view is only appropriate for certain classes of software development. Specifically, the Waterfall Model works well when the software requirements are
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
well understood (e.g., software such as compilers or operating systems) and the nature of the software development involves contractual agreements. The Waterfall Model is a natural fit for contract-based software development since this model is document driven; that is, many of the products such as the requirements specification and the design are documents. These documents then become the basis for the software development contract. There have been many waterfall variations since the initial model was introduced by Winston Royce in 1970 in a paper entitled: “managing the development of large software systems: concepts and techniques”. Barry Boehm, developer of the spiral model (see below) modified the waterfall model in his book Software Engineering Economics (Prentice-Hall, 1987). The basic differences in the various models is in the naming and/or order of the phases. The basic waterfall approach looks like the illustration below. Each phase is done in a specific order with its own entry and exit criteria and provides the maximum in separation of skills, an important factor in government contracting. Example of a typical waterfall approach While some variations on the waterfall theme allow for iterations back to the previous phase, “In practice most waterfall projects are managed with the assumption that once the phase is completed, the result of that activity is cast in concrete. For example, at the end of the design phase, a design document is delivered. It is expected that this document will not be updated throughout the
Image of page 2
rest of the development. You cannot climb up a waterfall.” (Murray Cantor,
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern