WLAN checkpoint - is shared among clients and access...

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Securing your wireless LAN is very important for your personal and professional safety and privacy. There are a few ways to do this, you can use WEP, and TKIP. The way that WEP works is it uses RC4 encryption scheme with a key that can be 40, 64, 128 or 256 bits in length. The 802.11 design uses RC4’s shared key. There is a random key sent from the access point at the request of registration. The node that receives it assigns the key with a secret key that was previously shared. There is a check by the node through the access point and if it checks out, then the sign on is allowed. The second security protocol that can be used is TKIP ( Temporal Key Integrity Protocol), the TKIP fixes the key reuse problem for WEP, which is periodically using the same key to encrypt data. The process for TKIP starts with a 128 bit “temporal key” that
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Unformatted text preview: is shared among clients and access points. The ramifications of a breach of security in a WLAN can be as small as someone using your internet to stealing information. Really though the breach isnt small at all, another person can access your entire network, they can pull your files whether they are business or personal. Your business payroll, your bank accounts, social security numbers, and your personal banking information can all be accessed or used by a complete stranger. When the internet is accessed from an un-authorized user on your network any illegal activity that they may perform comes straight back to your network, and can cause major legal repercussions. It is very important to utilize your security software, and to remember what can happen should an un-authorized user gain access to your WLAN....
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