Chapter 3 Smartbook .pdf - Chapter 3 Notes Individual...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 12 pages.

Chapter 3 Notes Individual Differences and Emotions Learning Objections: (1) How does understanding the relative stability of individual differences benefit me? (2) How do multiple intelligences affect my performance? (3) How does my personality affect my performance at school and work? (4) How do self-evaluations affect my performance at work? (5) What is emotional intelligence and how does it help me? (6) How can understanding emotions make me more effective at work? 1. The Differences Matter How does understanding the relative stability of individual differences benefit me? - Individual differences (IDs) are the many attributes, such as traits and behaviors, that describe each of us as a person. - IDs are a big part of what gives each of us our unique identities, and they are fundamental to the understanding and application of OB. - So, what is it that makes us different? Is it our genetics or our environment? The answer is both.2 And while the way you are raised, along with your experiences and opportunities, indeed helps shape who you are, a large volume of research on twins suggests that genetics matters more. But what is more important at work is recognizing the many attributes that make us unique individuals, regardless of whether they are due to nature or nurture. - On the left-hand side of Figure 3.2 we arrange individual differences on a continuum. At the top of the continuum are intelligence and cognitive abilities, which are relatively fixed. This means they are stable over time and across situations and are difficult to change. At the bottom are attitudes (which we discussed in Chapter 2) and emotions, which are relatively flexible. Emotions change over time and from situation to situation, and they can be altered more easily. To 1
Chapter 3 Notes Individual Differences and Emotions elaborate, you aren't more or less intelligent at school than you are at work or home, although your emotions commonly change within and between all of these places. Of course both your intelligence and emotions, as well as many other individual characteristics influence the many outcomes included in the right side of Figure 3.2. - The distinction between relatively fixed and flexible individual differences has great practical value. Wise managers know they have little or no impact on fixed IDs. You can’t change an employee’s level of intelligence or remake an employee’s personality.3 But you can help employees manage their attitudes and emotions. For instance, many effective managers (and their employers) select employees based on positive, job-relevant, but relatively stable IDs. This hiring strategy enables managers to capitalize on the personal strengths that someone brings to a job because these stable strengths affect behavior and performance in most every work situation.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture