MullerLucht-resolution-07

MullerLucht-resolution-07 - Click Here JOURNAL OF...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Robustness of terrestrial carbon and water cycle simulations against variations in spatial resolution Christoph Mu ¨ller 1,2 and Wolfgang Lucht 1 Received 3 August 2006; revised 24 October 2006; accepted 10 November 2006; published 21 March 2007. [ 1 ] Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) of the terrestrial carbon and water cycle have been developed and validated at specific spatial resolutions (mostly 0.5 ° ) but are increasingly being coupled to climate models at coarser spatial resolutions. Is this permissible? We ran the LPJ-DGVM at different spatial resolutions (0.5 Â 0.5 ° to 10.0 Â 10.0 ° in 0.5 ° intervals) to assess the robustness of terrestrial carbon and water flux simulations to changes in spatial resolution. We show that global model results are robust with only small deviations in the single-digit percent range from a benchmark run at 0.5 ° . The magnitude of the deviation increases with grid coarseness. Temporal dynamics are largely unaffected by grid cell size. The deviations from the benchmark are mostly spread evenly in space and are otherwise concentrated in areas with strong environmental gradients. We conclude that for coarse-resolution model coupling (such as with climate models) as well as for specific global-scale applications (such as global agroeconomic modeling or integrated assessment modeling) the spatial resolution of DGVMs can be reduced to coarser grids with little biogeochemical error. Citation: Mu ¨ller, C., and W. Lucht (2007), Robustness of terrestrial carbon and water cycle simulations against variations in spatial resolution, J. Geophys. Res. , 112 , D06105, doi:10.1029/2006JD007875. 1. Introduction [ 2 ] Models of terrestrial biogeochemistry and vegetation dynamics are increasingly being coupled to general circu- lation climate models (GCMs). The uncoupled versions for these terrestrial models, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs), however, have commonly been developed, op- erated and validated at a higher spatial resolution (typically 0.5 ° ) than is usually the case for GCMs (several degrees typically). Are the simulated terrestrial carbon and water fluxes robust against this change of spatial resolution? The answer to this question is not just relevant to the use of DGVMs in GCMs but equally to the use of vegetation models in socioeconomically and agroeconomically oriented Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs), which equally lack high spatial resolution (typically they operate on 10–20 socioeconomic regions). [ 3 ] Process-based Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) are the state-of-the-art in simulating the global terrestrial biosphere. They are applied to studying the carbon cycle [ Bachelet et al. , 2001; Cramer et al. , 2001; Dargaville et al. , 2002; House et al. , 2003; Woodward and Lomas ,2 0 0 4 ; Schaphoff et al. , 2006], the water cycle [ Kucharik et al. , 2000; Gerten et al. , 2004; Leipprand and Gerten
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course EAS 8803 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Page1 / 7

MullerLucht-resolution-07 - Click Here JOURNAL OF...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online