Zhang_Feb 14 - Turbulence depends on depth and friction...

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Coherent Eddies and Turbulence in Vegetation Canopies: The mixing-layer analogy M.R.Raupach, J.J.Finnigan and Y.Brunet Boundary-Layer Meteorology 78: 351-382, 1996
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Objectives This paper argues that the turbulence near the top of the canopy is similar to that of a plane mixing layer rather than of the boundary layer
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The Mixing Layer The mixing layer is the turbulence shear flow formed between two coflowing streams with different velocities. The characteristic of the mixing layer is a strong inflection in the mean velocity profile. Mixing layer turbulence has a distinctive pattern of coherent motion. It has streamwise periodicity, which is proportional to the vorticity thickness. The ratio ranges 3.5 to 5.
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Unformatted text preview: Turbulence depends on depth and friction velocity and is sensitive to initial conditions. The Mixing Layer The Canopy The Conopy The Canopy Eddies dominating turbulence transfer are of canopy scale. Three types of observations: Honami waves Two-point turbulence statistics Conditional analyses The Mixing-Layer Analogy The Mixing-Layer Anology Conclusions Introduced basic properties of turbulence in canopies and in the mixing layer Validated the mixing-layer analogy for the canopy by tests in three aspects: statistical flow properties, the turbulence energy budget and turbulent length scales Described several useful statistical and observational methods in turbulence study...
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course EAS 8803 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Zhang_Feb 14 - Turbulence depends on depth and friction...

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