MIT6_01F09_lec06 - 6.01 Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 6.01...

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6.01: Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 October 15, 2009 1 6.01: Introduction to EECS I Circuits Week 6 October 15, 2009 The Circuit Abstraction Circuits represent systems as connections of component through which currents (through variables) flow and across which voltages (across variables) develop. + + + + The Circuit Abstraction Circuits are important for two very different reasons: as physical systems power (from generators and transformers to power lines) electronics (from cell phones to computers) as models of complex systems neurons brain cardiovascular system hearing The Circuit Abstraction Circuits are the basis of our enormously successful semiconductor industry. 4004 8008 8080 8086 80286 80386 80486 Pentium Pentium II Pentium III Pentium 4 Itanium Itanium 2 Dual-Core Itanium 2 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 1,000 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 10,000,000 100,000,000 1,000,000,000 # of transistors year The Circuit Abstraction Circuits as models of complex systems: myelinated neuron. What is a Circuit? Circuits are connections of components through which currents (through variables) flow and across which voltages (across variables) develop. + + + + Model of Myelinated Nerve Fiber Dendritic tree Internode Node of Ranvier Myelinated fiber Axonal tree Cell body + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ Internode Node of Ranvier Internode Node of Ranvier Internode Figure by MIT OpenCourseWare.
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6.01: Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 October 15, 2009 2 Rules Governing Flow Rule 1: Currents flow in loops. Example: flow of electrical current through a flashlight When the switch is closed, electrical current flows through the loop. The same amount of current flows into the bulb (top path) and out of the bulb (bottom path). Rules Governing Flow Rule 2: Like the flow of water, the flow of electrical current (charged particles) is incompressible. Example: flow of water through a branching point i 1 i 2 i 3 What comes in must go out.
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