MIT6_01F09_lec06

MIT6_01F09_lec06 - 6.01 Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 1...

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Unformatted text preview: 6.01: Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 October 15, 2009 1 6.01: Introduction to EECS I Circuits Week 6 October 15, 2009 The Circuit Abstraction Circuits represent systems as connections of component • through which currents (through variables) flow and • across which voltages (across variables) develop. + − + − + − + − The Circuit Abstraction Circuits are important for two very different reasons: • as physical systems − power (from generators and transformers to power lines) − electronics (from cell phones to computers) • as models of complex systems − neurons − brain − cardiovascular system − hearing The Circuit Abstraction Circuits are the basis of our enormously successful semiconductor industry. 4004 8008 8080 8086 80286 80386 80486 Pentium Pentium II Pentium III Pentium 4 Itanium Itanium 2 Dual-Core Itanium 2 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 1,000 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 10,000,000 100,000,000 1,000,000,000 # of transistors year The Circuit Abstraction Circuits as models of complex systems: myelinated neuron. What is a Circuit? Circuits are connections of components • through which currents (through variables) flow and • across which voltages (across variables) develop. + − + − + − + − Model of Myelinated Nerve Fiber Dendritic tree Internode Node of Ranvier Myelinated fiber Axonal tree Cell body + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ + _ Internode Node of Ranvier Internode Node of Ranvier Internode Figure by MIT OpenCourseWare. 6.01: Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 October 15, 2009 2 Rules Governing Flow Rule 1: Currents flow in loops. Example: flow of electrical current through a flashlight When the switch is closed, electrical current flows through the loop. The same amount of current flows into the bulb (top path) and out of the bulb (bottom path)....
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course COMPUTER 6.01 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at MIT.

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MIT6_01F09_lec06 - 6.01 Introduction to EECS 1 Week 6 1...

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