MIT6_012F09_lec10

MIT6_012F09_lec10 - 6.012 - Microelectronic Devices and...

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Unformatted text preview: 6.012 - Microelectronic Devices and Circuits Lecture 10 - MOS Caps II; MOSFETs I - Outline S c • Review - MOS Capacitor The "Delta-Depletion Approximation" – vGS + (= vGB) G SiO2 n+ (n-MOS example) Flat-band voltage: VFB ≡ vGB such p-Si that φ(0) = φp-Si: VFB = φp-Si – φm B Threshold voltage: VT ≡ vGB such that φ(0) = – φp-Si: VT = VFB – 2φp-Si + [2εSi qNA|2φp-Si| ]1/2/Cox* Inversion layer sheet charge density: qN* = – Cox*[vGC – VT] • Charge stores - qG(vGB) from below VFB to above VT Gate Charge: qG(vGB) from below VFB to above VT Gate Capacitance: Cgb(VGB) Sub-threshold charge: qN(vGB) below VT • 3-Terminal MOS Capacitors - Bias between B and C Impact is on VT(vBC): |2φp-Si| → (|2φp-Si| - vBC) • MOS Field Effect Transistors - Basics of model Gradual Channel Model: electrostatics problem normal to channel drift problem in the plane of the channel Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 1 S C The n-MOS capacitor – vGS + (= vGB) G SiO2 n+ p-Si Right: Basic device with vBC = 0 B Below: One-dimensional structure for depletion approximation analysis* vGB + – SiO 2 G -tox 0 Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 p-Si B x * Note: We can't forget the n+ region is there; we will need electrons, and they will come from there. Lecture 10 - Slide 2 MOS Capacitors: Where do the electrons in the inversion layer come from? Diffusion from the p-type substrate? If we relied on diffusion of minority carrier electrons from the p-type substrate it would take a long time to build up the inversion layer charge. The current density of electrons flowing to the interface is just the current across a reverse biased junction (the p-substrate to the inversion layer in this case): D 2 2 Je = q ni e N A w p ,eff [Coul/cm - s] The time, τ, it takes this flux to build up an inversion charge is the the increase in the charge, Δqn, divided by Je: ! s o τ is Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! #ox "q = " (vGB $ VT ) t ox * N # q* $ox N A w p ,eff N "= = # (vGB % VT ) 2 Je q n i De t ox Lecture 10 - Slide 3 Diffusion from the p-type substrate. cont.? Using NA = 1018 cm-3, tox = 3 nm, wp,eff = 10 µm, De = 40 cm2/V and Δ(vGB-VT) = 0.5 V in the preceding expression for τ we find τ ≈ 50 hr! Flow from the adjacent n+-region? As the surface potential is increased, the potential energy barrier between the adjacent n+ region and the region under the gate is reduced for electrons and they readily flow (diffuse in weak inversion, and drift and diffuse in strong inversion) into the channel; that's why the n+ region is put there: G S There are many electrons here and they don't have far to go once the barrier is lowered. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 – vGS + (= vGB) SiO2 n+ p-Si B Lecture 10 - Slide 4 Electrostatic potential and net charge profiles - regions and boundaries φ(x) φ(x) φ(x) -tox vGB φp x φm ρ(x) vGB -tox φm qNAxd -tox - Cox*(vGB - VFB) Cox*(vGB - VFB) Acccumulation vGB < VFB x vGB xd x φp qNAXDT + Cox*(vGB - VT) ρ(x) -t o x xd −qNA vGB -φ p -tox φm XDT |2φp | φp ρ(x) -t o x x XDT −qNA qD* = -qNAxd x qN* qD* = -qNAXDT = - Cox*(vGB - VT) x Strong Inversion VT < vGB Depletion ( Weak Inversion ) when φ(0) > 0 VFB < vGB < VT vGB Threshold Voltage VT = VFB+|2φp|+(2εSi|2φp|qNA)1/2/Cox* Flat Band Voltage VFB = φp – φm φ(x) φ(x) vGB -tox φm φp x -φp -tox φm qNAXDT ρ(x) -tox vGB x -tox −qNA Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 XDT |2φp | x φp ρ(x) XDT qD* = -qNAXDT x Lecture 10 - Slide 5 MOS Capacitors: the gate charge as vGB is varied qG [coul/cm2] * " 2Cox2 (vGB $ VFB ) ( #SiqN A % " ' 1+ qG = $ 1* " ' * Cox & #SiqN A ) " " qG = Cox (vGB # VT ) Inversion Layer Charge + qN AP X DT qNAPXDT ! Depletion Region Charge VFB q =C " G " ox (vGB # VFB ) The charge expressions: " , Cox (vGB # VFB ) . " . %SiqN A & 2Cox2 (vGB # VFB ) ) " ( 1+ qG (vGB ) = # 1+ " ( + %SiqN A . Cox ' * . C " (v # V ) + qN X / ox GB T A DT Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! vGB [V] VT Accumulation Layer Charge " Cox # for vGB $ VFB for $ox t ox VFB $ vGB $ VT ! VT $ vGB for Lecture 10 - Slide 6 MOS Capacitors: the small signal linear gate capacitance, Cgb(VGB) $ #qG Cgb (VGB ) " A #vGB Cgb(VGB) [coul/V] vGB = VBG Cox Accumulation Depletion VFB " & A Cox ( ( " Cgb (VGB ) = ' A Cox ( " ( A Cox ) ! VGB [V] VT for VGB # VFB for VFB # VGB # VT for " 2Cox2 (VGB $ VFB ) 1+ %SiqN A This expression can also be written )1 as: # t ox x d (VGB ) & Cgb (VGB ) = A% + ( "ox "Si ' $ Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Inversion ! VT # VGB G εox Aεox/tox [= Cox] εSi AεSi/xd(VGB) B Lecture 10 - Slide 7 MOS Capacitors: How good is all this modeling? How can we know? Poisson's Equation in MOS As we argued when starting, Jh and Je are zero in steady state so the carrier populations are in equilibrium with the potential barriers, φ(x), as they are in thermal equilibrium, and we have: n ( x ) = n ie q" ( x ) kT and p( x ) = n ie# q" ( x ) kT Once again this means we can find φ(x), and then n(x) and p(x), by solving Poisson's equation: ! d 2" ( x ) q = # n i (e# q" ( x ) / kT # e q" ( x ) / kT ) + N d ( x ) # N a ( x ) dx 2 $ [ ! This version is only valid, however, when |φ(x)| ≤ -φp. When |φ(x)| > -φp we have accumulation and inversion layers, and we assume them to be infinitely thin sheets of charge, i.e. we model them as delta functions. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 8 Poisson's Equation calculation of gate charge Calculation compared with depletion approximation model for tox = 3 nm and NA = 1018 cm-3: tox,eff ≈ 3.2 nm tox,eff ≈ 3.3 nm Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 We'll look in this vicinity next. Lecture 10 - Slide 9 Plot courtesy of Prof. Antoniadis MOS Capacitors: Sub-threshold charge Assessing how much we are neglecting Sheet density of electrons below threshold in weak inversion: In the depletion approximation for the MOS we say that the charge due to the electrons is negligible before we reach threshold and the strong inversion layer builds up: * qN ( inversion ) (vGB ) = " Cox (vGB " VT ) But how good an approximation is this? To see, we calculate the electron charge below threshold (weak inversion): qN ( sub " threshold ) (vGB ) = " q ! 0 $ ne x i ( vGB ) i q# ( x ) / kT dx This integral is difficult to do because φ(x) is non-linear "( x) = " p + ! qN A 2 x - xd ) ( 2#Si but if we use a linear approximation for φ(x) near x = 0, where the term in the integral is largest, we can get a very good approximate analytical expression for the integral. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! Lecture 10 - Slide 10 Sub-threshold electron charge, cont. We begin by saying 2qN A [" (0) % " p ] d" ( x ) " ( x ) # " (0) + ax where a $ =% where dx x = 0 &Si With this linear approximation to φ(x) we can do the integral and find ! ! qN ( sub " threshold ) (vGB ) # q kT n (0) kT ="q qa q $Si n ie q% ( 0 ) kT 2qN A [% (0) " % p ] To proceed it is easiest to evaluate this expression for various values of φ(0) below threshold (when its value is |φp|), and to also find the corresponding value of vGB, from vGB " VFB = # (0) " # p + t ox 2$SiqN A [# (0) " # p ] $ox This has been done and is plotted along with the strong inversion layer charge above threshold on the following foil. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! Lecture 10 - Slide 11 Sub-threshold electron charge, cont. 6 mV Neglecting this charge results in a 6 mV error in the threshold voltage value, a very minor impact. We will see its impact on sub-threshold MOSFET operation in Lecture 12. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 12 MOS Capacitors: A few more questions you might have about our model Why does the depletion stop growing above threshold? A positive voltage on the gate must be terminated on negative charge in the semiconductor. Initially the only negative charges are the ionized acceptors, but above threshold the electrons in the strong inversion layer are numerous enough to terminate all the gate voltage in excess of VT. The electrostatic potential at 0+ does not increase further and the depletion region stops expanding. How wide are the accumulation and strong inversion layers? A parameter that puts a rough upper bound on this is the extrinsic Debye length 2 LeD " kT #Si q N When N is 1019 cm-3, LeD is 1.25 nm. The figure on Foil 11 seems to say this is ~ 5x too large and that the number is nearer 0.3 nm.* Is n, p = nie±qV/kT valid in those layers? ! It holds in Si until |φ| ≈ 0.54 V, but when |φ| is larger than this Si becomes "degenerate" and the carrier concentration is so large that the simple models we use are no longer sufficient and the dependence on φ is more complex. Thinking of degenerate Si as a metal is far easier, and works extremely well for our purposes. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 * Note that when N = 1020 cm-3, LeD ≈ 0.4 nm. Lecture 10 - Slide 13 Bias between n+ region and substrate, cont. Reverse bias applied to substrate, I.e. vBC < 0 C vBC < 0 – vBC + – vGC + G SiO2 n+ p-Si B Soon we will see how this will let us electronically adjust MOSFET threshold voltages when it is convenient for us to do so. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 14 φ(x) With voltage between substrate and channel, vBC < 0 Threshold: vGC = VT(vBC) with vBC < 0 vGB = VT(vBC) -φp – vBC -tox -φ p |2φp| – vBC XDT(vCB = 0) X (v < 0) DT BC φm x φp qNAXDT ρ(x) VT(vBC) = VFB + |2φp| + [2εSi(|2φp|-vBC)qNA]1/2/Cox* {This is vGC at threshold} XDT(vBC < 0) = [2εSi(|2φp|-vBC)/qNA]1/2 XDT(vBC < 0) -tox −qNA Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 qN* = -qNAxDT qN* = -[2εSi(|2φp|-vBC)qNA]1/2 x Lecture 10 - Slide 15 Bias between n+ region and substrate, cont. - what electrons see The barrier confining the electrons to the source is lowered by the voltage on the gate, until high level injection occurs at threshold. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 16 Bias between n+ region and substrate, cont. - what electrons see The barrier confining the electrons to the source is lowered by the voltage on the gate, until high level injection occurs at threshold. When the source-substrate junction is reverse biased, the barrier is higher, and the gate voltage needed to reach threshold is larger. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 17 An n-channel MOSFET capacitor: reviewing the results of the depletion approximation, now allowing for vBC ≠ 0. C vBC < 0 vGC – + G SiO2 n+ – vBC + p-Si B Flat - band voltage : VFB " vGB at which # (0) = # p $ Si VFB = # p $ Si $ # m Threshold voltage : VT " vGC at which # (0) = $ # p $ Si + v BC VT (v BC ) = VFB Accumulation [ Depletion VFB ! { 1 $ 2# p $ Si + * 2%Si qN A 2# p $ Si $ v BC Cox Inversion 0 Inversion layer sheet charge density : VT vCG * q* = " Cox [vGC " VT (v BC )] N Accumulation layer sheet charge density : Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 } 1/ 2 * q* = " Cox [vGB " VFB )] P Lecture 10 - Slide 18 An n-channel MOSFET S – vGS G + iG n+ vDS D iD n+ p-Si vBS + B iB Gradual Channel Approximation: There are two parts to the problem: the vertical electrostatics problem of relating the channel charge to the voltages, and the horizontal drift problem in the channel of relating the channel charge drift to the voltages. We will assume they can be worked independently and in sequence. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 19 An n-channel MOSFET showing gradual channel axes S G + vGS – n+ 0 0 iG D iD n+ x p-Si vBS vDS + B iB L y Extent into plane = W Gradual Channel Approximation: - We first solve a one-dimensional electrostatics problem in the x direction to find the channel charge, qN*(y) - Then we solve a one-dimensional drift problem in the y direction to find the channel current, iD, as a function of vGS, vDS, and vBS. Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 20 Gradual Channel Approximation i-v Modeling (n-channel MOS used as the example) We restrict voltages to the following ranges: v BS " 0, v DS # 0 This means that the source-substrate and drain-substrate junctions are always reverse biased and thus that: ! iB (vGS , v DS , v BS ) " 0 The gate oxide is insulating so we also have: iG (vGS , v DS , v BS ) " 0 With the back current, iB, zero, and the gate current, iG, zero, ! the only current that is not trivial to model is iD. The drain current, iD, is also zero except when when vGS > VT. ! The in-plane problem: (for just a minute so we can see where we're going) Looking at electron drift in the channel we write iD as iD = " W sey ( y ) q* ( y ) = " W µe q* ( vGS , v BS , vCS ( y )) n n dv cs dy (at moderate E - fields) This can be integrated from y = 0 to y = L, and vCS = 0 to vCS = vDS, to get iD(vGS, vDS,vBS), but first we need qn*(y). ! Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 (derivation continues on next foil) Lecture 10 - Slide 21 Gradual Channel Approximation, cont. We get qn*(y) from the normal problem, which we do next. The normal problem: The channel charge at y is qn*(y), which is: * * q* ( y ) = " Cox {vGC ( y ) " VT [vCS ( y ), v BS ]} = " Cox {vGS " vCS ( y ) " VT [vCS ( y ), v BS ]} n { } [ with VT [vCS ( y ), v BS ] = VFB " 2# p " Si + 2$SiqN A 2# p " Si " v BS + vCS ( y ) ! 1/ 2 * Cox We can substitute this expression into the iD equation we just had and integrate it, but the resulting expression is deemed too algebraically awkward: iD (v DS , vGS , v BS ) = ( 1 W v' 3 + *$ µe Cox 2& vGS " 2# p " VFB " DS )v DS + 2*SiqN A - 2# p + v DS " v BS , L 2( 2 3% ) 3/2 ( " 2# p " v BS ) 3/2 .4 05 /6 A simpler, more common approach is to simply ignore the dependence of VT on vCS, and thus to say { [ VT [vCS ( y ), v BS ] " VT (v BS ) = VFB # 2$ p # Si + 2%SiqN A 2$ p # Si # v BS } 1/ 2 * Cox With this simplification we have: * q* ( y ) " # Cox [vGS # VT (v BS ) # vCS ( y )] n ! lif Fonstad, 10/15/09 C (derivation continues on next foil) ! Lecture 10 - Slide 22 Gradual Channel Approximation, cont. The drain current expression (the in-plane problem): Putting our approximate expression for the channel charge into the drain current expression we obtained from considering the in-plane problem, we find: iD = " W µe q* (vCS ) n dvCS dv * # W µe Cox {vGS " VT (v BS ) " vCS ( y )} CS dy dy This expression can be integrated with respect to dy for y = 0 to y = L. On the left-hand the integral with respect to y can be converted to one with respect to vCS, which ranges from 0 at y = 0, to vDS at y = L: ! L "i D 0 dy = v DS "W µ e * Cox {vGS # VT (v BS ) # vCS ( y )} dvCS 0 Doing the definite integrals on each side we obtain a relatively simple expression for iD: ! Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! v& *# iD L = W µe Cox $vGS " VT (v BS ) " DS ' v DS % 2( (derivation continues on next foil) Lecture 10 - Slide 23 Gradual Channel Approximation, cont. The drain current expression, cont: Isolating the drain current, we have, finally: iD (vGS , v DS , v BS ) = W v& *# µe Cox %vGS " VT (v BS ) " DS ( v DS $ L 2' Plotting this equation for increasing values of vGS we see that it traces inverted parabolas as shown below. inc. ! iD vGS vDS Note,however, that iD saturates at its peak value for larger values of vDS (solid lines); it doesn't fall off (dashed lines). Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 24 Gradual Channel Approximation, cont. The drain current expression, cont: The point at which iD reaches its peak value and saturates is easily found. Taking the derivative and setting it equal to " iD zero we find: =0 when v DS = [vGS # VT (v BS )] " v DS What happens physically at this voltage is that the channel (inversion) at the drain end of the channel disappears: ! * q* ( L) " # Cox {vGS # VT (v BS ) # v DS } n =0 when v DS = [vGS # VT (v BS )] For vDS > [vGS-VT(vBS)], all the additional drain-to-source voltage appears across the high resistance region at the drain end of the! channel where the mobile charge density is very small, and iD remains constant independent of vDS: iD (vGS , v DS , v BS ) = Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 ! 1W 2 * µe Cox [vGS " VT (v BS )] for 2L v DS > [vGS " VT (v BS )] Lecture 10 - Slide 25 iD Gradual Channel Approximation, cont. Derived neglecting the variation of the depletion layer charge with y. ! iG (vGS , v DS , v BS ) = # ) ) ) iD (vGS , v DS , v BS ) = $! ) )W )L % Linear or Triode Region Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 0 iD + B vBS vGS – S for [vGS " VT (v BS )] < 0 < v DS 0 < [vGS " VT (v BS )] < v DS for 0 < v DS < [vGS " VT (v BS )] for 1W 2 * µe Cox [vGS " VT (v BS )] 2L v& *# µe Cox $vGS " VT (v BS ) " DS ' v DS % 2( iB G+ iB (vGS , v DS , v BS ) = 0 0 + vDS iG The full model: D Cutoff Saturation Linear or Triode increasing vGS Saturation or Forward Active Region Cutoff Region vDS Lecture 10 - Slide 26 The operating regions of MOSFETs and BJTs: Comparing an n-channel MOSFET and an npn BJT iD MOSFET D + Linear iD or Triode iG Saturation (FAR) vDS G+ iD ! K [vGS - V T(vBS)]2/2! vGS – iC BJT C – S + Cutoff vDS iB vCE B+ Saturation iC i vBE – B – E FAR iB ! IBSe qV BE /kT vCE > 0.2 V Cutoff 0.6 V Input curve Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 vBE Forward Active Region iC ! !F iB 0.2 V Cutoff vCE Output family Lecture 10 - Slide 27 6.012 - Microelectronic Devices and Circuits Lecture 10 - MOS Caps II; MOSFETs I - Summary • Quantitative modeling (Apply depl. approx. to MOS cap., vBC = 0) Definitions: VFB ≡ vGB such that φ(0) = φp-Si VT ≡ vGB such that φ(0) = – φp-Si Results and expressions Cox* ≡ εox/tox (For n-MOS example) 1. Flat-band voltage, VFB = φp-Si – φm 2. Accumulation layer sheet charge density, qA* = – Cox*(vGB – VFB) 3. Maximum depletion region width, XDT = [2εSi|2φp-Si|/qNA]1/2 4. Threshold voltage, VT = VFB – 2φp-Si + [2εSi qNA|2φp-Si|]1/2/Cox* 5. Inversion layer sheet charge density, qN* = – Cox*(vGB – VT) • Subthreshold charge Negligible?: Yes in general, but (1) useful in some cases, and (2) an issue for modern ULSI logic and memory circuits • MOS with bias applied to the adjacent n+-region Maximum depletion region width: XDT = [2εSi(|2φp-Si| – vBC)/qNA]1/2 Threshold voltage: VT = VFB – 2φp-Si + [2εSi qNA(|2φp-Si| – vBC)]1/2/Cox* • MOSFET i-v (the Gradual Channel Approximation) (vGC at threshold) Vertical problem for channel charge; in-plane drift to get current Clif Fonstad, 10/15/09 Lecture 10 - Slide 28 MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits Fall 2009 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms. ...
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