Asexual Reproduction

Asexual Reproduction - AsexualReproduction WorldofPlants...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Asexual Reproduction World of Plants Standard Grade Biology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sexual Reproduction Asexual Reproduction Definition •Involves  sex cells  and  fertilisation •Does not involve  sex cells   and  fertilisation •Only one  parent  plant Advantages/ Disadvantages •Offspring are not  genetically identical  to  one another •There is  variation  in the  offspring •Offspring have no  variation •Offspring are  genetically identical  to one another
Background image of page 2
Asexual reproduction Also known as  vegetative propagation 3 methods of vegetative propagtaion -tubers -bulbs -runners
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tubers Tubers are underground food stores  which stores food over the winter and  provides a new plant with food until  it can make its own. Food made by the new plant is sent to  make new tubers. Thereby reproducing  itself. Examples: potato, artichoke, yam,  cassava, water chestnut, arrowroot Taro- Japanese  potato
Background image of page 4
Bulbs E.g. daffodils, lilies
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 11

Asexual Reproduction - AsexualReproduction WorldofPlants...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online