Jonathan P. How

Jonathan P. How - Topic #1 16.31 Feedback Control Systems...

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Unformatted text preview: Topic #1 16.31 Feedback Control Systems Motivation Basic Linear System Response Cite as: Jonathan How, course materials for 16.31 Feedback Control Systems, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY]. Fall 2007 16.31 11 16.31: Introduction G c ( s ) G ( s ) u ( t ) y ( t ) e ( t ) r ( t ) d ( t ) Goal: Design a controller G c ( s ) so that the system has some desired characteristics. Typical objectives: Stabilize the system (Stabilization) Regulate the system about some design point (Regulation) Follow a given class of command signals (Tracking) Reduce response to disturbances. (Disturbance Rejection) Typically think of closed-loop control so we would analyze the closed-loop dynamics. Open-loop control also possible (called feedforward) more prone to modeling errors since inputs not changed as a result of measured error. Note that a typical control system includes the sensors, actuators, and the control law. The sensors and actuators need not always be physical devices ( e.g., economic systems). A good selection of the sensor and actuator can greatly simplify the control design process. Course concentrates on the design of the control law given the rest of the system (although we will need to model the system). September 2, 2007 Cite as: Jonathan How, course materials for 16.31 Feedback Control Systems, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY]. Fall 2007 16.31 12 Why Use Control Typically easy question to answer for aerospace because many vehi- cles (spacecraft, aircraft, rockets) and aerospace processes (propul- sion) need to be controlled just to function Example: the F-117 does not even y without computer con- trol, and the X-29 is unstable But there are also many stable systems that simply require better performance in some sense (e.g., faster, less oscillatory), and we can use control to modify this behavior. September 2, 2007 Cite as: Jonathan How, course materials for 16.31 Feedback Control Systems, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY]. Fall 2007 16.31 13 Feedback Control Approach Establish control objectives Qualitative dont use too much fuel Quantitative settling time of step response < 3 sec Typically requires that you understand the process (expected commands and disturbances) and the overall goals (bandwidths). Often requires that you have a strong understanding of the physical dynamics of the system so that you do not fight them in inappropriate ( i.e., inecient) ways....
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This note was uploaded on 11/07/2011 for the course AERO 16.31 taught by Professor Jonathanhow during the Fall '07 term at MIT.

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Jonathan P. How - Topic #1 16.31 Feedback Control Systems...

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