l1_intro - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu HST.582J /...

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu HST.582J / 6.555J / 16.456J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing Spring 2007 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms .
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Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology HST.582J: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing, Spring 2007 Course Director: Dr. Julie Greenberg HST582J/6.555J/16.456J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing Spring 2007 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSING ± c Bertrand Delgutte 1999 Signals convey information A signal is a function of one or several variables that carries useful information. A signal is said to be biological if it is recorded from a living system, and conveys information about the state or behavior of that system. For example, the temperature record of a patient, the voltage recorded by an electrode placed on the scalp, and the spatial pattern of X-ray absorption obtained from a CT scan are biological signals. Signals can be either one-dimensional, if they depend on a single variable such as time, or multidimensional if they depend on several variables such as spatial coordinates. The first part of these notes will be concerned with one-dimensional signals.
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l1_intro - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu HST.582J /...

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