Whorf4 - Linguistic Relativity Whorf Language and Thought...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Linguistic Relativity Whorf
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Language and Thought Our innate biological potential is transformed by culture: to make us who we are to extend our abilities in various and often different ways to limit our possibilities as well. ..
Background image of page 2
Benjamin Lee Whorf Language conditions our thinking It leads us to think "habitually" in certain ways (like a record groove keeps a needle moving along) Tennis player
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Benjamin Lee Whorf Two approaches here: 1. Look at word meanings (much weaker influence) 2. Look at grammatical forms (much stronger influence)
Background image of page 4
Word meanings Fire examples: 1. "empty" 2. "limestone"
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
From John Lucy's Language Diversity and Thought Linguistic form "empty" Linguistic meanings "container no longer "null and void, negative, contains intended inert" contents" Mental drum no longer drum is no longer interpretations contains gasoline dangerous; OK to smoke cigarettes Nonlinguistic gasoline drum worker smokes observables without gasoline cigarettes (explosion)
Background image of page 6
What is it? Different languages “cut up” the world differently in two main ways: They do this in terms of words and domains They do this in terms of grammar
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Why do word meanings have a weaker influence?
Background image of page 8
Why do word meanings have a weaker influence? The main reason is that individual words are things we can focus on and think about more easily than the grammar of our language. We can, in this case, see that "empty" does not always really mean "empty", but rather can mean "functionally empty": though gas vapors may remain, we aren't going to get any more gas out of that drum.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An "empty" glass and an "empty" soda can
Background image of page 10
Grammatical structure as influencing thought Let us first consider English and Yucatec Maya. English nouns tend to emphasize "form" and "function" (eg, "table"
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course ECON 102 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at Saddleback.

Page1 / 38

Whorf4 - Linguistic Relativity Whorf Language and Thought...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online