Chemistry 101-page11

Chemistry 101-page11 - fatigue, and irregular heart beat....

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- High doses can result in skin rash, nausea, abnormal liver function and changes in heart rhythm. - Niacin deficiency – pellagra (is seen in countries with corn based diets) - Added to whear flour along with riboflavin, thiamin, and folic acid. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) - Class: Water soluble - Source: Many fresh fruits and vegetables. - Benefits: Aids synthesis of collagen for bone and connective tissue development. - Effectiveness in preventing or treating the common cold is unproven. - Toxicity: High doses causes GI distress. Essential Minerals - There are seven macronutrient minerals o Calcium o Phosphorus o Magnesium o Sodium o Potassium o Chlorine o Sulfur - Deficiencies are rare except for long term calcium which plays a role in osteoporosis. Na+, K+, Cl- - Important electrolytes for muscle function (including the heart) and nerve impulse function. - Deficiency caused by extreme fluid loss can cause vomiting, GI distress, muscle cramps,
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Unformatted text preview: fatigue, and irregular heart beat. Ca++ -99% is in bone and hard tissue -Also important for muscle and nerve function -Absorption through the gut is promoted by lactose and also by regulated by Vitamin D. -Insufficient calcium intake over time can lead to low bone mass and an increase in fracture risk particularly in women. -Bone mass loss is accelerated in women after menopause but can be slowed with estrogen replacement therapy and/or diphosphonates. Micronutrient Minerals -Four key micronutrient minerals. o Iron (needed for hemoglobin, prevents anemia) o Copper (important for certain enzymes) o Zinc (Growth, immune function, wound healing, found in meat primarily) (many of the health benefits claims with supplementation are bull) o Iodine (essential for the thyroid function)...
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Everettturner during the Fall '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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