TR-2_Stable_Truss_2011C (2)

TR-2_Stable_Truss_2011C (2) - The Bridge Project. How to...

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1 TR-2 The Bridge Project. How to Build a Stable Truss.
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2 PS RAT # 1 (Always individual) Here comes your first R eadiness A ssessment T est (based on previous HWk and reading assignment)
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RAT #1 1. Use the Law of Sines to find two relationships for the calculation of angle A. 2. Use the Law of Cosines to write an expression for the length of side c squared (c 2 ) 3
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4 Class TR-2 Objectives Recap: Engineering design. Introduce the notion of systems and subsystems. Define the Bridge Project. Intro to force transmission systems and trusses. When you complete this module you should be able to Build SuperMag trusses that are stable Identify unstable truss structures Stabilize them with cross bracing Properly restrain them against motion
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5 Truss Bridge Project Summary Using a SuperMag kit, build an inexpensive “bridge” (4.30 - 5.30 inches long) that carry a minimum load of at least 2 lbs (places at or near the center of the bridge). In order to get approval to actually construct the bridge you need to 1. Show the CLIENTS the plans for the bridge. 2. Prove to them, by calculation, that the bridge has the requisite load carrying capacity. 3. Calculate the “cost” of the bridge. Detailed specifications can be found on Enotes (file Project – 1- Bridge.doc, under week 01).
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6 Force Transmission systems The basic task is to build a system (Bridge) to transmit forces with guaranteed performance . This task is common to ANYTHING that you build: airframes, cars, human assist devices (wheel chairs, heart pumps etc.) Requires SPECIALIZED knowledge: building structures that don’t collapse, calculating their load carrying capacity, communicating this information to the clients.
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7 Metal Truss Railroad Bridge (Kama River, near Perm city). A Russian truss bridge by Lavr Proskuryakov. Early colour photograph, taken ca. 1912. (from Wikipedia)
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8 FORMULA SAE CAR Z Y Z X Y X Y X Z Chassis
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9 Bicycle frame
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10 Airplane frames
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11 Complicated Force Transmission System
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Truss Components Last class, you calculated the angles and lengths for a truss. How did you approach the problem? Is there another (easier) way? 12
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Vectors A critical concept for the representation of some physical entities Necessary for entities that are oriented or that have direction A construct with MAGNITUDE and DIRECTION 13
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Force Vector Direction of force is critical to resulting action. For example, try to push a door that needs to be pulled—a wrongly directed force will result in a wrong action. Force is a vector entity; and so are displacement, velocity, and acceleration. 14
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The basis method wherewith we first specify the directions of a coordinate basis and then specify how much of each basis direction the vector possesses. 15
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course ENGR 111 A taught by Professor Reddy during the Spring '10 term at Texas A&M.

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TR-2_Stable_Truss_2011C (2) - The Bridge Project. How to...

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