TR8_ENGR111A_2011C (1)

TR8_ENGR111A_2011C (1) - Exam Info Time/Location: Wed Oct 5...

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ENGR 111 Track A 1 Exam Info Time/Location: Wed Oct 5 at 6:30pm 114 Richardson Multiple Choice and workout problems Alternative Exam (CVLB 421) 3:00pm and (CVLB 418) 4:30pm (Same Day) – You arrange this with me by Monday Testable Topics (Problem Solving: Definition of Truss Stable Truss Force Components Cartesian Coord translation Moment (Torque) Cables/pulleys FBD Reaction/Resultant Forces Member Forces/Method of Joints Zero Force Members by Inspection Factor of Safety
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ENGR 111 Track A 2 The Engineering Process: Using quantification to make decisions! Decision making from quantitative data: Will the truss withstand the necessary load? Calculation of the Safe Loads in a Truss TR-8
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ENGR 111 Track A 3 Learning Objectives At the end of this module, you will be able to: Identify the two common modes of structural failure. Locate the links that are most likely to fail in a truss. Apply a standard procedure using the measured separation load on the links to calculate the allowable safe operating load on a truss. Apply Factor of Safety when necessary.
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ENGR 111 Track A 4 Safe Load on a Truss What is meant by the allowable design load on a truss? Allowable loads (working loads) are the forces to which the links can be safely subjected. This is the calculated load that can be applied to the truss which will just cause one of the links to fail. For the trusses (bridges) that you build, it is the load at which the link with the max tensile load separates from the magnet.
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ENGR 111 Track A 5 Quantification of Truss Failures How do we quantify collapse and deformation? The two principal modes of failure are (1) Failure by separation (tensile failure) (2) Failure by deflection (buckling) Failure by separation is quantified by the minimum load required to separate any portion of the truss from the rest. Failure by separation is caused by tensile loads. For the truss that we build, consider only tensile failure. Failure by deflection is quantified by the maximum amount of deflection that is allowed in any links of a truss even though it is not yet separated from the other links. Failure by deflection is caused by compressive loads.
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ENGR 111 Track A 6 Procedure for Identifying the Links at Risk
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TR8_ENGR111A_2011C (1) - Exam Info Time/Location: Wed Oct 5...

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