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MVC#3 - Clarence Li RUID 120006843 Section 03 MVC#3 Analyze...

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Clarence Li RUID 120006843 Section 03 MVC #3 Analyze your own parenting philosophy and practices. What principles from social learning theory, Bowlby, Ainsworth, Piaget, Vygotsky, information processing theory, developmental neuroscience and other theories do you appear to have relied on in making your parenting choices or interpreting your child's behavior? Include three principles/theorists from the above list in your answer. Throughout the MyVirtualChild process of raising Bubbles, my parenting practices alternate depending on the resulting behaviors of my child. The parenting philosophies that I upheld were to get Bubbles to grow up in a more socially interactive environment than to be overprotective and make her dependent on others. Over the course of the childcare program, from her birth to two years of age, I have relied on subsequent theories such as Bowlby’s, Piaget’s, and Vygotsky’s theories to nurture my child. Over the two years, Bubble’s level of attachment had made her quite of a difficult child to handle. With Bowlby’s and Ainsworth’s attachment theory, they suggested Bubbles to develop an ambivalent attachment towards my partner. Ambivalent attachment was regarded as those who were suspicious of strangers, displayed distress when the important parent or caregiver left the child, and did not appear to be comforted by the return of the parent or caregiver. In my child’s example, Bubbles loved to explore new situations and visiting relatives, and even with a temporary fear of unfamiliar faces, she would eventually get used to the strangers. However,
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