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anthro extra credit - Eric Russo Exam 1 Extra Credit Lisa...

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Eric Russo Exam 1 Extra Credit Lisa Rios 11:15 Concept 1: Structure and Structural Violence 1a) Structural Violence: Violence which is done systematically by different social groups in everyday life. Structure: The way our society is formed around certain social groups and cultures which, depending on the situation one was born into, can make it easier or harder to obtain jobs, good education, good living experience and environment, and an overall better quality of life. 1b) Depending on the culture and social class someone was born into and brought up in is what decides upon the structure surrounding their lifestyle. So, for some people structure isn’t always a bad thing. Structural violence, though, is always a bad thing. Whether if the people of the higher classes know of the situation going on, or if they are blinding themselves to the outside world, they are allowing structural violence to happen. For instance at the beginning of Farmers article he talks about how the Haitians were forced to get help at a free hospital because they couldn’t get help any place else. The health problems going on in Haiti are a lot worse than what is going on in the United States, but people just allow it to happen. Lastly, structure is something that a person is born into. Structural violence is what happens on the outside, and what contains the consequences of being in that lower class. 1c) Both structure and structural violence are blamed on specific individuals rather than the social structure as a whole. Structure and structural violence work side by side because structural violence needs structure to work. Lastly, structure and structural violence are both affected by the higher classes blindness and unwillingness to understand the struggles of the lower classes. 2a) “Walking into a special class, I see twelve children. One is white. Eleven are black. There are no Asian children. The room is half the size of mainstream classrooms. ‘Because of crowding’, ‘says the principle’, “we have to split the rooms in half. There is no computer and no sink.” (pg 95 Kozol) Kozol then speaks about a fourth grade gifted class. “In my notes: Six girls, four boys. Nine white, one Chinese. I am glad they have this class. But what about the others? Aren’t there ten black children in the school who would enjoy this also?” (pg 97-95 Kozol) 2b) The differences between structure and structural violence in this quote are that structures don’t always negatively affect people’s life’s.
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