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l4 - 16.810 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping...

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16.810 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping Lecture 4 Computer Aided Design (CAD) Instructor(s) Prof. Olivier de Weck January 6, 2005
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Plan for Today CAD Lecture (ca. 50 min) CAD History, Background Some theory of geometrical representation SolidWorks Introduction (ca. 40 min) Led by TA Follow along step-by-step Start creating your own CAD model of your part (ca. 30 min) Work in teams of two Use hand sketch as starting point 16.810 2
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Course Concept today 16.810 3
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Course Flow Diagram (2005) 16.810 CAD Introduction FEM/Solid Mechanics Design Optimization CAM Manufacturing Training Hand sketching CAD design Optimization Revise CAD design Assembly Parts Fabrication Problem statement Final Review Test Learning/Review Deliverables (A) Hand Sketch (B) Initial Airfoil (D) Final Design (E) Completed Wing (F) Test Data & (C) Initial Design Structural Tunnel Testing optional (G) CDR Package Xfoil Airfoil Analysis FEM/Xfoil analysis Assembly Cost Estimation Design Intro / Sketch & Wind 4
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What is CAD? Computer Aided Design (CAD) A set of methods and tools to assist product designers in Creating a geometrical representation of the artifacts they are designing Dimensioning, Tolerancing Configuration Management (Changes) Archiving Exchanging part and assembly information between teams, organizations Feeding subsequent design steps Analysis (CAE) Manufacturing (CAM) …by means of a computer system. 16.810 5
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Ref: menzelus.com Basic Elements of a CAD System Input Devices Main System Output Devices Computer Keyboard Mouse CAD Software Database Hard Disk Network Printer CAD keyboard Plotter Templates Space Ball Human Designer 16.810 6
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Brief History of CAD 1957 PRONTO (Dr. Hanratty) – first commercial numerical- control programming system 1960 SKETCHPAD (MIT Lincoln Labs) Early 1960’s industrial developments General Motors – DAC (Design Automated by Computer) McDonnell Douglas – CADD Early technological developments Vector-display technology Light-pens for input Patterns of lines rendering (first 2D only) 1967 Dr. Jason R Lemon founds SDRC in Cincinnati 1979 Boeing, General Electric and NIST develop IGES (Initial Graphic Exchange Standards), e.g. for transfer of NURBS curves Since 1981: numerous commercial programs Source: http://mbinfo.mbdesign.net/CAD-H istory.htm 16.810 7
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Major Benefits of CAD Productivity (=Speed) Increase Automation of repeated tasks Doesn’t necessarily increase creativity! Insert standard parts (e.g. fasteners) from database Supports Changeability Don’t have to redo entire drawing with each change EO – “Engineering Orders” Keep track of previous design iterations Communication With other teams/engineers, e.g. manufacturing, suppliers With other applications (CAE/FEM, CAM) Marketing, realistic product rendering Accurate, high quality drawings Caution: CAD Systems produce errors with hidden lines etc… Some limited Analysis Mass Properties (Mass, Inertia) Collisions between parts, clearances 16.810 8
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Generic CAD Process Start Engineering Sketch
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