MIT16_842F09_sw03b

MIT16_842F09_sw03b - Isoperformance: Analysis and Design of...

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Isoperformance: Analysis and Design of Complex Systems with Desired Outcomes O. De Weck and M. Jones Presented by Student 3 and Student 4 September 25, 2009
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Motivation Traditional design is based on maximizing performance. This focus on pure performance maximization can result in drawbacks in terms of cost, schedule, and risk Performance Schedule Cost Diminishing returns at the margin of the performance envelope Augustine Law Number XV: “The last 10 percent of performance generates 1/3 of the cost and 2/3 of the problems.” RISK
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Core concept: accept “good enough” performance instead of seeking “best achievable” Performance = NIB (vs. performance = LIB). Willingness to trade some performance for benefits in terms of cost, schedule or risk. Inverse method that finds all the designs that satisfy a certain level of performance: these designs exhibit isoperformance E.g. design of antennae, digital circuits, or airfoils. This subspace of designs can then be explored to find the efficient ones in terms of secondary metrics. NIB
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course AERO 16.810 taught by Professor Olivierdeweck during the Winter '07 term at MIT.

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MIT16_842F09_sw03b - Isoperformance: Analysis and Design of...

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