MIT16_842F09_sw09

MIT16_842F09_sw09 - Mission to Mars Harvard Business School...

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Mission to Mars Harvard Business School Case Study 6 November 2009 Sreeja Nag 2LT Jake Hall Mission to Mars Harvard Business School Case Study 6 November 2009 Sreeja Nag Student 9 Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. Used with permission.
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Overview Brief history NASA JPL Early Mars missions Viking Mars Observer Faster, better, cheaper Pathfinder Mars Global Surveyor Mars 1998 Mars Climate Orbiter Mars Polar Lander Aftermath Way ahead Discussion 6 Nov 2009 2
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NASA “An Act to provide for research into the problems of flight within and outside the Earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes” 1 October 1958 One year after the launch of Sputnik Absorbed National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Originally started with 8,000 employees NASA logo removed due to copyright restrictions. $100 million budget Multiple research centers absorbed in succession. 6 Nov 2009 3
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6 Nov 2009 4 JPL Federally funded R&D center funded by the California Institute of Technology Originated from work by Von Karman for the US Army in World War II Rocket engines, guidance and control NASA’s center of excellence for planetary exploration Lead many explorations including Ranger, Surveyor, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Magellan, Galileo, and Ulysses FORMATION TIMELINE 1.1936: Von Karman tested early rocket engines in the wilderness area of Arroyo Seco 2.1943: He received funding during WW2 to analyze the German V2 control missiles program. JPL was an Army facility operated under contract by Caltech. 3.1954: Teamed up with Von Braun’s Army Ballistic Missile Agency 4.February 1958: JPL and ABMA launched Explorer 1 5.October 1958: Transferred to NASA.
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Early Mars Missions •1877: Italian astronomer Schiaperelli identified channels through his telescope, called them canali, people mistook that for ancient water canals and harbored the possibility of aliens. •1965: Mariner 4 returned 21 photos that showed that atmosphere was thin, too much CO2, no signs of life. •1971: Mariner 9 returned 7329 photos showing craters, lava flows. •1975: Viking 50k+ photos. NO SIGNS OF LIFE – thus public attention stunted and no Mars mission was sent in the next 15 years. 6 Nov 2009 5 Photos from jpl.nasa.gov Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. Used with permission.
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Early Mars Missions Viking Mission (1975) Mars Observer (1992) Goal to look for evidence of Goal to study geoscience and life climatology of Mars over a $1 billion ($4 billion in two year span 2000 USD) $813 million ($1.13 billion in Two spacecraft, each with 2000 USD) orbiter and lander >10 years to build.
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MIT16_842F09_sw09 - Mission to Mars Harvard Business School...

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