12_humanfactors_rev4

12_humanfactors_rev4 - 16.886 Human Factors for Autonomous...

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16.886 Human Factors for Autonomous Formation Flying Mary (Missy) Cummings Humans and Automation Division Aeronautics & Astronautics
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Formation Flight Basics • Section v. division differences • The tighter the formation, the higher the workload – Implications for system management • Wingman uses significantly more fuel • Formation flights account for 14 percent of all midairs U.S. Navy photo
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Autonomous Formation Flying in Action Keeping Position • http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Movie/AFF/HTML/EM-0081-01.html Refueling • http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Movie/AAR/HTML/EM-0053-01.html
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Position Issues • Wing must stay within 10% of lead’s wingspan for 30% fuel savings (Proud et al., 1999): – Military: C-17: 171’, C-141: 160’, C-5: 223’ – Commercial: 747: 196’, A300: 147’ • Previous flights – 2001: 55’ (two F/A-18s) (12% savings) – 2003: 200’ (DC-8/F/A-18) (29% savings) • Pilots most sensitive to changes in roll – The most significant vortex disturbance when positioned for
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12_humanfactors_rev4 - 16.886 Human Factors for Autonomous...

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