lean_ii - 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 16.885J/ESD.35J...

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Unformatted text preview: 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 16.885J/ESD.35J Aircraft Systems Engineering Lean Systems Engineering II November 18, 2003 Prof. Earll Murman 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Systems Engineering and Lean Thinking Systems Engineering grew out of the space industry in response to the need to deliver technically complex systems that worked flawlessly upon first use SE has emphasized technical performance and risk management of complex systems. Lean Thinking grew out of the Japanese automobile industry in response to the need to deliver quality products with minimum use of resources. Lean has emphasized waste minimization and flexibility in the production of high quality affordable products with short development and production lead times. Both processes evolved over time with the common goal of delivering product or system lifecycle value to the customer. 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Lean Systems Engineering Value Phases Value Value Value Delivery Identification Proposition Identify the Develop a robust Deliver on the promise stakeholders and value proposition with good technical their value to meet the and program expectations expectations performance Lean Systems Engineering (LeanSE) applies the fundamentals of lean thinking to systems engineering with the objective of delivering best lifecycle value for complex systems and products. An example of lean thinking applied to systems engineering is the use of IPPD and IPTs - see Lean Systems Engineering I lecture. Understanding and delivering value is the key concept to LeanSE A broad definition of value is how various stakeholders find particular worth, utility, benefit, or reward in exchange for their respective contributions to the enterprise. 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Todays Topics Recap of system engineering fundamentals Revisit fundamentals of lean thinking Value principles, the guide to applying lean thinking Lean Enterprise Model (LEM), a reference for identifying evidence of lean thinking applied to an enterprise Comparison of F/A-18E/F practices to the LEM An example of looking for evidence of LeanSE Examples of LeanSE extracted from various Lean Aerospace Initiative research projects 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Simplified Systems Engineering Process Steps Functional Analysis Needs: End user Customer Enterprise Regulatory Requirements Verification Synthesis Production, Delivery & Operation Validation Systems engineering process is applied recursively at multiple levels: system, subsystem, component. Source: Adapted f rom Jackson, S . Systems Engineering for Commercial Aircraft 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Other Systems Engineering Elements Allocation of functions and budgets to subsystems Interface management and control I P P D Trade studies Decision gates or milestones SRR, SDR, PDR, CDR, Risk management Lifecycle perspective 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 Fundamentals For Developing a Lean Process...
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lean_ii - 16.885J/ESD.35J - Nov 18, 2003 16.885J/ESD.35J...

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