MITESD_77S10_lec19

MITESD_77S10_lec19 - Multidisciplinary System Design...

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1 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Design for Value Lecture 19 Karen Willcox Olivier de Weck Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MSDO) Select figures courtesy of Jacob Markish and Ryan Peoples. Used with permission.
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2 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Today’s Topics • An MDO value framework • Lifecycle cost models • Value metrics & valuation techniques • Value-based MDO • Aircraft example • Spacecraft Example
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3 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Optimal Design • Traditionally, design has focused on performance e.g. for aircraft design optimal = minimum weight • Increasingly, cost becomes important • 85% of total lifecycle cost is locked in by the end of preliminary design. • But minimum weight minimum cost maximum value • What is an appropriate value metric?
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© Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Design Example We need to design a particular portion of the wing Traditional approach: balance the aero & structural requirements, minimize weight We should consider cost: what about an option that is very cheap to manufacture but performance is worse? aerodynamics? How do we trade performance and cost? How much performance are we willing to give up for $100 saved? What is the impact of the low-cost design on price and demand of this aircraft? What is the impact of this design decision on the other aircraft I build? What about market uncertainty? structural dynamics? manufacturing cost? aircraft demand? aircraft price? tooling? environmental impact?
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5 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Cost Module “Value” metric Performance Module Aerodynamics Structures Weights Mission Stability & Control Revenue Module Value Optimization Framework Manufacturing Tooling Design Operation Market factors Fleet parameters Competition “Optimal” design
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6 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Challenges Cost and revenue are difficult to model – often models are based on empirical data – how to predict for new designs Uncertainty of market Long program length Time value of money Valuing flexibility Performance/financial groups even more uncoupled than engineering disciplines
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7 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Prof. de Weck and Prof. Willcox Engineering Systems Division and Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics Cost Model Need to model the lifecycle cost of the system.
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course AERO 16.851 taught by Professor Ldavidmiller during the Fall '03 term at MIT.

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MITESD_77S10_lec19 - Multidisciplinary System Design...

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