Chapter 17 (Comparative Planetology of the Terrestrial Planets) Quiz

Chapter 17 (Comparative Planetology of the Terrestrial Planets) Quiz

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Astronomy 101: Chapter 17: The Terrestrial Planets 1. When Earth formed, it melted and differentiated. What was the source of heat that melted Earth? a. The in-fall of matter that formed Earth. b. The decay of radioactive elements. c. Sunlight striking Earth's surface. d. Both a and b above. e. All of the above. 2. With a small telescope we see that the moon has regions that are relatively smooth, and others that are saturated with impact craters. What does this tell us about the moon's development? a. The moon never went through the differentiation stage. b. The moon never experienced surface flooding by lava. c. The moon doesn't have much slow surface evolution. d. Both a and b above. e. All of the above. 3. Earth's interior can be divided up into four zones: the inner core, the outer core, the mantle, and the crust. Which of these zones has the lowest density? a. The inner core. b. The outer core. c. The mantle. d. The crust. e. All four zones have the same density. 4. What creates Earth's strong dipole magnetic field? a. The attractive force between massive particles. b. The conduction of solar wind particles through solid Earth. c. The conduction of solar wind particles around Earth's ionosphere. d. The sun's magnetic field induces an opposing magnetic field in Earth. e. Convection in Earth's outer liquid iron-nickel core combined with Earth's rotation. 5. What erased the impact craters and other surface features of Earth's early surface, and is responsible for most of the landforms that we see today? a. Plate tectonics. b. Water and ice erosion. c. Erosion by the solar wind. d. Both a and b above. e. Both b and c above.
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6. What happened to the majority of the carbon dioxide that was formerly in Earth's atmosphere? a. Most of it remains in the atmosphere today.
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Chapter 17 (Comparative Planetology of the Terrestrial Planets) Quiz

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