chapter 14 notes

chapter 14 notes - Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium 2010...

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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved Chapter 14 Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved Equilibrium Equilibrium W Up to now, we’ve treated all reactions as though they go to completion W Some reactions go to an extent and stop Dynamic equilibrium Like people at a party
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved The Equilibrium Constant The Equilibrium Constant W We can measure equilibrium W The ratio of moles is constant W Consider aA + bB cC + dD. At equilibrium [ ] [ ] [] b a d c B A D C K =
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved Working with K Working with K W K is constant at a given temperature W Changing the concentrations will not change K W Because the stoichiometric coefficients appear in K, multiplying the reaction by a number requires raising K to that power [ ] [ ] [] b a d c B A D C K dD cC bB aA = + + [ ] [ ] 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 K B A D C K dD cC bB aA b a d c = = + +
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved Example Example W Calculate K for the reaction N 2 (g) + 3H 2 (g) 2NH 3 (g) if [NH 3 ] = 0.031M, [N 2 ] = 0.85M and [H 2 ] = 0.0031M () 4 3 2 10 8 . 3 0031 . 0 85 . 0 031 . 0 × = = K
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved More examples More examples W Now consider 2NH 3 (g) N 2 (g) + 3H 2 (g) K’ = 1/K = 2.6 × 10 -5 W Now what about ½N 2 (g) + 3/2H 2 (g) NH 3 (g) K” = K = 190
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved K K P P W The equilibrium constant we’ve worked with so far is expressed in terms of concentration Called K c W For gases, it would be more convenient to express in terms of pressure We can. Called K p
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©2010 Donald L. Siegel, All Rights Reserved K K P P and K and K C C b b a a d d c c P P P P P K = [][] b a d c b b a a d d c c b b a a d d c c b a d c C RT RT P P P P RT P RT P RT P RT P B A D C K + + × = = = 1 1 aA(g) + bB(g)
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 162 taught by Professor Siegal during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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chapter 14 notes - Chapter 14 Chemical Equilibrium 2010...

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