Absolute_Zero_Lab

Absolute_Zero_Lab - Absolute Zero Lab During the States of...

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Unformatted text preview: Absolute Zero Lab During the States of Matter unit we discussed the concept of absolute zero, the temperature at which all particle motion stops. We know this does not occur at 0 o C because we can easily move below this temperature. We saw what happened to materials in liquid nitrogen (-196 o C), they got really cold but there is still kinetic energy left in the particles. To determine where absolute zero occurs, we must first realize that gases are made up of mostly empty space. The particles are so small that we can pretty much ignore their size (its a sig figs thing!). It is the space between the particles that accounts for 99.999% of a gass volume. What keeps this space between the particles is the fact the particles are constantly moving and bouncing off of each other. As we have seen in demos and labs when a sample of gas cools the volume decreases, because the particles are moving slower, and there is less space between them. It follows then that if we cool the particles enough the particles would stop moving and volume would become zero. While we cant get this cold, we can measure the volume of a gas at different temperatures and and volume would become zero....
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Absolute_Zero_Lab - Absolute Zero Lab During the States of...

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