Conservation_of_Mass_Lab

Conservation_of_Mass_Lab - Unit IV: Chemical Reactions...

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Unit IV: Chemical Reactions Date: How can we prove that mass is conserved in a reaction? Two hundred years ago, Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, a French chemist, established the law of conservation of mass based on his experiments. Lavoisier was the first to recognize that the total mass of the products of a reaction is always equal to the total mass of the reactants. How can we prove his statement to be true? The Reaction The reaction we will use to prove the conservation of mass is one you have probably used before. Have you ever taken an Alka Seltzer tablet for indigestion? Before swallowing the tablet, you drop it into a glass of water and allow a reaction to occur. What the reaction looks like: Reactants Products H 2 O + Na(HCO 3 ) CO 2 + NaOH + H 2 O [Water + Alka Seltzer Carbon dioxide + Sodium Hydroxide + Water] Question 1: By looking at the above chemical equation, how do you know what you are about to observe is a chemical reaction and not a physical change? In the chart, indicate the number of atoms of each element that are shown on the
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Sdfsdf during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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Conservation_of_Mass_Lab - Unit IV: Chemical Reactions...

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