WritingChemicalFormulas

WritingChemicalFormulas - Writing Chemical Formulas What...

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Writing Chemical Formulas What number is never used as a subscript in a chemical formula? Pharmacist Chemical formulas represent compounds. Oxidation numbers are used to determine the ratio in which elements combine to form compounds. Oxidation numbers tell the number of electrons an atom gained or lost when forming the compound. The plus or minus indicates if electrons were lost or gained. Since electrons have a negative charge, and atom with a negative oxidation number will gain electrons. That means an atom with a positive oxidation number will lose electrons. Nonmetals and polyatomic ions almost always gain electrons - have negative oxidation numbers . Metals almost always lose electrons - have positive oxidation numbers . The number indicates how many electrons. Example: Aluminum has an oxidation number of +3. It will lose 3 electrons when forming compounds. Oxygen has an oxidation number of -2. It will gain 2 electrons when forming compounds.
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Sdfsdf during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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WritingChemicalFormulas - Writing Chemical Formulas What...

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