Rosengarten_Chemistry

Rosengarten_Chemistry - (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Mark...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Mark Rosengartens Amazing Chemistry Powerpoint Presentation! Aligned to the New York State Standards and Core Curriculum for The Physical Setting- Chemistry Can be used in any high-school chemistry class! Please give the link to this file to your chemistry students! www.markrosengarten.com Enjoy it!!! A LOT of work has gone into bringing you this work, so please credit me when you use it! (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Outline for Review 1) The Atom (Nuclear, Electron Config) 2) Matter (Phases, Types, Changes) 3) Bonding (Periodic Table, Ionic, Covalent) 4) Compounds (Formulas, Reactions, IMAFs) 5) Math of Chemistry (Formula Mass, Gas Laws, Neutralization, etc.) 6) Kinetics and Thermodynamics (PE Diagrams, etc.) 7) Acids and Bases (pH, formulas, indicators, etc.) 8) Oxidation and Reduction (Half Reactions, Cells, etc.) 9) Organic Chemistry (Hydrocarbons, Families, Reactions) (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten The Atom 1) Nucleons 2) Isotopes 3) Natural Radioactivity 4) Half-Life 5) Nuclear Power 6) Electron Configuation 7) Development of the Atomic Model (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Nucleons Protons: +1 each, determines identity of element, mass of 1 amu, determined using atomic number , nuclear charge Neutrons: no charge, determines identity of isotope of an element, 1 amu, determined using mass number - atomic number (amu = atomic mass unit) 32 16 S and 33 16 S are both isotopes of S S-32 has 16 protons and 16 neutrons S-33 has 16 protons and 17 neutrons All atoms of S have a nuclear charge of +16 due to the 16 protons. (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Isotopes Atoms of the same element MUST contain the same number of protons. Atoms of the same element can vary in their numbers of neutrons, therefore many different atomic masses can exist for any one element. These are called isotopes. The atomic mass on the Periodic Table is the weight-average atomic mass , taking into account the different isotope masses and their relative abundance. Rounding off the atomic mass on the Periodic Table will tell you what the most common isotope of that element is. (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Weight-Average Atomic Mass WAM = ((% A of A/100) X Mass of A) + ((% A of B/100) X Mass of B) + What is the WAM of an element if its isotope masses and abundances are: X-200: Mass = 200.0 amu, % abundance = 20.0 % X-204: Mass = 204.0 amu, % abundance = 80.0% amu = atomic mass unit ( 1.66 10-27 kilograms/amu) (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Most Common Isotope The weight-average atomic mass of Zinc is 65.39 amu. What is the most common isotope of Zinc? Zn-65! What are the most common isotopes of: Co Ag S Pb FACT: one atomic mass unit (1.66 10-27 kilograms) is defined as 1/12 of the mass of an atom of C-12....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Sdfsdf during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

Page1 / 219

Rosengarten_Chemistry - (c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Mark...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online