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Rosengarten_Chemistry

Rosengarten_Chemistry - Mark Rosengartens Amazing Chemistry...

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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Mark Rosengarten’s Amazing Chemistry Powerpoint Presentation! Aligned to the New York State Standards and Core Curriculum for “The Physical Setting- Chemistry” Can be used in any high-school chemistry class! Please give the link to this file to your chemistry students! www.markrosengarten.com Enjoy it!!! A LOT of work has gone into bringing you this work, so please credit me when you use it!
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Outline for Review 1) The Atom (Nuclear, Electron Config) 2) Matter (Phases, Types, Changes) 3) Bonding (Periodic Table, Ionic, Covalent) 4) Compounds (Formulas, Reactions, IMAF’s) 5) Math of Chemistry (Formula Mass, Gas Laws, Neutralization, etc.) 6) Kinetics and Thermodynamics (PE Diagrams, etc.) 7) Acids and Bases (pH, formulas, indicators, etc.) 8) Oxidation and Reduction (Half Reactions, Cells, etc.) 9) Organic Chemistry (Hydrocarbons, Families, Reactions)
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten The Atom 1) Nucleons 2) Isotopes 3) Natural Radioactivity 4) Half-Life 5) Nuclear Power 6) Electron Configuation 7) Development of the Atomic Model
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Nucleons Protons: +1 each, determines identity of element, mass of 1 amu, determined using atomic number , nuclear charge Neutrons: no charge, determines identity of isotope of an element, 1 amu, determined using mass number - atomic number (amu = atomic mass unit) 32 16 S and 33 16 S are both isotopes of S S-32 has 16 protons and 16 neutrons S-33 has 16 protons and 17 neutrons All atoms of S have a nuclear charge of +16 due to the 16 protons.
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Isotopes Atoms of the same element MUST contain the same number of protons. Atoms of the same element can vary in their numbers of neutrons, therefore many different atomic masses can exist for any one element. These are called isotopes. The atomic mass on the Periodic Table is the weight-average atomic mass , taking into account the different isotope masses and their relative abundance. Rounding off the atomic mass on the Periodic Table will tell you what the most common isotope of that element is.
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Weight-Average Atomic Mass WAM = ((% A of A/100) X Mass of A) + ((% A of B/100) X Mass of B) + … What is the WAM of an element if its isotope masses and abundances are: X-200: Mass = 200.0 amu, % abundance = 20.0 % X-204: Mass = 204.0 amu, % abundance = 80.0% amu = atomic mass unit ( 1.66 × 10 -27 kilograms/amu)
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Most Common Isotope The weight-average atomic mass of Zinc is 65.39 amu. What is the most common isotope of Zinc? Zn-65! What are the most common isotopes of: Co Ag S Pb FACT: one atomic mass unit (1.66 × 10 -27 kilograms) is defined as 1/12 of the mass of an atom of C-12. This method doesn’t always work, but it usually does. Use it for the Regents exam.
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(c) 2006, Mark Rosengarten Natural Radioactivity Alpha Decay Beta Decay Positron Decay Gamma Decay Charges of Decay Particles Natural decay starts with a parent nuclide that ejects a decay particle to form a daughter nuclide which is more stable than the parent nuclide was.
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