Daily WarmUps

Daily WarmUps - Intro to Chemistry The world around you is...

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Intro to Chemistry The world around you is made up of trillions of particles that are too small to see. These bits of matter follow rules and laws that allow us to identify them and to predict how they will interact with one another. It has often been said that chemistry is the study of matter, its properties, and its behavior . Because we are surrounded by matter, chemistry is one of the most important sciences in that it allows us to observe and then change our environment. The question remains, however: How much should we change our environment, and can we predict the results before we do so? Name either 10 items that you could find in a typical household that are a direct result of people studying chemistry, or 10 ways that chemistry has changed the life of the average person, for better or for worse. 1
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All That Matters There are many ways to classify the materials we see around us every day. Is it a solid, liquid, gas, or plasma? Is it an element or a compound? Is it a pure substance or a mixture? The answers to these questions allow us to identify the things we see. For example, we learn to tell the difference between an apple and a banana, or either of those from a ham sandwich. All of these items are food, they all have nutrients, like vitamins and minerals, but they are not identical. Without the ability to observe the environment and identify what we are seeing, we would be unable to respond to and use the materials around us. Name some properties that you would use to tell the difference between a banana and a ham sandwich. Try to think of properties that could be used to tell any banana from any ham sandwich. 2
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Unique Properties We need to be able to identify the materials we see every day so that we can use them correctly. We do this by observing physical and chemical properties and comparing them to what we know from personal experience. Physical properties include such things as boiling point, color, density, hardness, melting point, odor, taste, and even electrical conductivity. Chemical properties are usually a measure of how a material reacts or fails to react with other substances. Will it burn? Does it dissolve in water? Does it produce bubbles of gas dropped into acid? All of these things allow us to tell the difference between water and alcohol, for example, and many other substances with the use of only one or two of our senses. List at least five of the physical and chemical properties of water and alcohol. What simple test could you do to determine which liquid was which? 3
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Measuring Up In the 1790’s, a group of scientists came to the first general agreement that using a single, worldwide system of measure would benefit all people. This system was named the metric system, and it gave us units of measure like meters and liters. The system was formally, and more universally, adopted in the 1960s when it
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 110 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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Daily WarmUps - Intro to Chemistry The world around you is...

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