{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

u1 - Outline Unit 1 Introduction to Chemistry Internet web...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–21. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 1 Introduction to Chemistry Internet web site: www.unit5.org/chemistry Outline PowerPoint Presentation by Mr. John Bergmann
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Safety
Image of page 2
Basic Safety Rules Use common sense. No horseplay. No unauthorized experiments. Handle chemicals/glassware with respect. Others: #1 Rule:
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Safety Features of the Lab safety shower fire blanket fire extinguisher eye wash fume hood circuit breaker switch
Image of page 4
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) gives information about a chemical -- lists “Dos” and “Don’ts;” emergency procedures --
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chemical Exposure a one-time exposure causes damage acute exposure chronic exposure damage occurs after repeated exposure reaction to drugs or medication e.g., e.g., smoking, asbestos
Image of page 6
the lethal dosage for 50% of the animals on which the chemical is tested LD50 There are various ways an LD50 can be expressed. For example, acetone has the following LD50s: ORL-RAT LD50: 5,800 mg/kg IHL-RAT LD50: 50,100 mg/m3-h SKN-RBT LD50: 20 g/kg
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Example Which is more toxic? Chemical A is more toxic because less of it proves fatal to half of a given population. Chemical A: LD50 = 3.2 mg/kg Chemical B: LD50 = 48 mg/kg
Image of page 8
Science
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Functions of Science pure science applied science the search for knowledge; facts using knowledge in a practical way e.g., aluminum strong lightweight good conductor
Image of page 10
Science attempts to establish cause-effect relationships.
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
risk-benefit analysis weigh pros and cons before deciding Because there are many considerations for each case, “50/50 thinking” rarely applies.
Image of page 12
How does scientific knowledge advance? 1. curiosity 2. good observations 3. determination 4. persistence
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Scientific Method
Image of page 14
** Key: Be a good observer. observation inference involves a judgment or assumption uses the five senses
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Types of Data Observations are also called data . qualitative data quantitative data clear liquid -- -- e.g., e.g., descriptions measurements 55 L or 83oC
Image of page 16
Parts of the Scientific Method Identify an unknown. Make a hypothesis : a testable prediction Repeatedly experiment to test hypothesis. procedure : order of events in experiment variable : any factor that could influence the result (i.e., a recipe)
Image of page 17

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Scientific Experiment conclusion: must be based on the data Experiments must be controlled : they must have two set-ups that differ by only one variable
Image of page 18
Scientific Law vs. Scientific Theory law: Theory of Gravity, Atomic Theory states what happens tries to explain why or how something happens -- e.g., does not change law of gravity, laws of conservation never violated -- -- theory: -- e.g., -- based on current evidence
Image of page 19

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Phlogiston Theory of Burning 1. Flammable materials contain phlogiston.
Image of page 20
Image of page 21
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern