atomic-models

Atomic-models - Models of the Atom a Historical Perspective Early Greek Theories Democritus 400 B.C Democritus thought matter could not be divided

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Models of the Atom Models of the Atom a Historical Perspective a Historical Perspective
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Aristotle Early Greek Theories 400 B.C. - Democritus thought matter could not be divided indefinitely. 350 B.C - Aristotle modified an earlier theory that matter was made of four “elements”: earth, fire, water, air. Democritus Aristotle was wrong. However, his theory persisted for 2000 years. fire air water earth This led to the idea of atoms in a void.
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John Dalton 1800 -Dalton proposed a modern atomic model based on experimentation not on pure reason. All matter is made of atoms. Atoms of an element are identical. Each element has different atoms. Atoms of different elements combine in constant ratios to form compounds. Atoms are rearranged in reactions. His ideas account for the law of conservation of mass (atoms are neither created nor destroyed) and the law of constant composition (elements combine in fixed ratios).
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Adding Electrons to the Model 1) Dalton’s “Billiard ball” model
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 110 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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Atomic-models - Models of the Atom a Historical Perspective Early Greek Theories Democritus 400 B.C Democritus thought matter could not be divided

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