limiting-reagents

limiting-reagents - Limiting Reagents Caution: this stuff...

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Limiting Reagents Caution: this stuff is difficult to follow at first. Be patient.
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g of NaHCO 3 mL of 3M HCl 1 10 25 2 10 50 3 10 100 How can we prove that our conclusions about limiting reagents is correct? Balloon & Flask Demonstration
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Limiting reagent defined Limiting reagent defined Q - How many moles of NO are produced if __ mol NH 3 are burned in __ mol O 2 ? 4 mol NH 3 , 5 mol O 2 4 mol NH 3 , 20 mol O 2 8 mol NH 3 , 20 mol O 2 Given: 4NH 3 + 5O 2 6H 2 O + 4NO 4 mol NO, works out exactly 4 mol NO, with leftover O 2 8 mol NO, with leftover O 2 Here, NH 3 limits the production of NO; if there was more NH 3 , more NO would be produced Thus, NH 3 is called the “limiting reagent” 4 mol NH 3 , 2.5 mol O 2 In limiting reagent questions we use the limiting reagent as the “given quantity” and ignore the reagent that is in excess … 2 mol NO, leftover NH 3
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Limiting reagents in stoichiometry Limiting reagents in stoichiometry E.g. How many grams of NO are produced if 4 moles NH 3 are burned in 20 mol O 2 ? Since NH 3 is the limiting reagent we will use this as our “given quantity” in the calculation 4NH 3 + 5O 2 6H 2 O + 4NO 4 mol NO 4 mol NH 3 x # g NO= 4 mol NH 3 = 1 20 g NO 30.0 g NO 1 mol NO x Sometimes the question is more complicated. For example, if grams of the two reactants are given instead of moles we must first determine moles, then decide which is limiting …
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Solving Limiting reagents 1: g to mol Q - How many g NO are produced if 20 g NH 3 is burned in 30 g O 2 ? A - First we need to calculate the number of moles of each reactant 4NH 3 + 5O 2 6H 2 O + 4NO 1 mol NH 3 17.0 g NH 3 x # mol NH 3 = 20 g NH 3 1.1 76 mol NH 3 = 1 mol O 2 32.0 g O 2 x # mol O 2 = 30 g O 2 0.93 75 mol O 2
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course CHEM 110 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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limiting-reagents - Limiting Reagents Caution: this stuff...

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