Chapter 10

Chapter 10 - Emotional Development How Children Develop...

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Emotional Development How Children Develop (3rd ed.) Chapter 10
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Emotional Intelligence l A set of abilities that contribute to competent social functioning: l Being able to motivate oneself and persist in the face of frustration l Control impulses and delay gratification l Identify and understand one’s own and others’ feelings l Regulate one’s moods l Regulate the expression of emotion in social interactions l Empathize with others’ emotions
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Emotional Intelligence l A better predictor than IQ of how well people will do in life, especially in their social lives l In research by Walter Mischel, preschoolers’ abilities to delay gratification were found to predict their social, emotional, and academic competence many years later.
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Overview l I. The Development of Emotions in Childhood l II. Regulation of Emotion l III. Individual Differences in Emotion and its Regulation l IV. Children’s Emotional Development in the Family l V. Culture and Children’s Emotional Development l VI. Children’s Understanding of Emotion
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I. The Development of Emotions in Childhood A. Theories on the Nature and Emergence of Emotion B. The Emergence of Emotion in the Early Years and Childhood
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I. The Development of Emotions in Early Childhood l Emotion is characterized by a motivational force or action tendency and by changes in physiology, subjective feelings, and overt behavior. l Although most psychologists share this general view of emotion, they often do not agree on the relative importance of its key components. l There is considerable debate, for example, about the basic nature of emotions, including whether they are innate or partly learned, and about when and in what form different emotions emerge during infancy.
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A. Theories on the Nature and Emergence of Emotion Research supports both perspectives to some degree, and no one theory has emerged as definitive. Discrete Emotions Theory The Functionalist Approach
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Discrete Emotions Theory Argues that: l Emotions are innate and are discrete from one another from very early in life. l Each emotion is packaged with a specific and distinctive set of bodily and facial reactions.
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The Functionalist Approach l Emphasizes the role of the environment in emotional development l Proposes that the basic function of emotions is to promote action toward achieving a goal l Maintains that emotions are not discrete from one another and vary somewhat based on the social environment
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B. The Emergence of Emotion in the Early Years and Childhood l To make their interpretations of infants’ emotions objective, researchers have devised highly elaborate systems for coding and classifying the emotional meaning of infants’ facial expressions.
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Chapter 10 - Emotional Development How Children Develop...

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