rec11 - ORIE 321/521 RECITATION 11 Spring 2007 In this...

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Unformatted text preview: ORIE 321/521 RECITATION 11 Spring 2007 In this recitation, we return to an application mentioned at the start of the fall semester. The registrar of a prominent university approaches you to help with the problem of scheduling final exams. At this university, each course is first placed into one of two categories: courses for which there are multiple lecture sections (such as introductory Chemistry, Physics, Math- ematics, or Computer Science courses), and the rest. The courses in the first category are called exception courses, and the others are called regular courses. The exception courses are grouped into 6 groups (based on their basic subject material) and the regular courses are grouped into 14 groups (based on the starting time of the first lecture of the semester). The underly- ing principle of this grouping of all courses into 20 groups is that no student can be concurrently taking two courses that end up in the same group. To schedule the final exams, these 20 groups are placed in 7 days, 3 groups per day. (So one might really imagine that there are 21 groups, one of which contains no courses at all.) It turns out that students are (rightly) complaining that, for too many of them than seems reasonable, they have 3 finals in each of the 3 slots in one day. In your first model, the aim will be to determine a schedule for which there are the minimum number of students who are in that predicament....
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rec11 - ORIE 321/521 RECITATION 11 Spring 2007 In this...

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