poetic terms 2

poetic terms 2 - POETICTERMS POETICTERMS EnglishIII...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–22. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
POETIC TERMS POETIC TERMS English III Mr. Wallock
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A reference to a  A reference to a  historical figure, place, or  historical figure, place, or  event event.
Background image of page 2
The teams  competed in a  David and Goliath  struggle .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A broad comparison between  two basically different things  that have some points in  common.
Background image of page 4
Aspirations  toward space are  not new.   Consider the  worm that  becomes a  butterfly.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A direct comparison between  two basically different things.   A simile is introduced by the  words “like” or “as”.
Background image of page 6
My love  is like a  red, red  rose.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An implied comparison  between two basically different  things.  Is not introduced with  the words “like” or “as”.
Background image of page 8
His eyes  were  daggers that  cut right  through me.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A great exaggeration to  emphasize strong  feeling.
Background image of page 10
I will love  you until  all the  seas go  dry.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Human characteristics are  given to non-human  animals, objects, or ideas.
Background image of page 12
My stereo  walked  out of my  car.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An absent person or  inanimate object is directly  spoken to as though they  were present.
Background image of page 14
Brutus:  “Ceasar , now  be still.  I killed  not thee with  half so good a  will.”
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A part stands for the  whole or vice versa.
Background image of page 16
The hands   that created  the work of art  were  masterful.
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hints given to the  reader of what is to  come.
Background image of page 18
“The stalwart  hero was  doomed to suffer  the destined end  of his days.”
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The use of concrete  details that appeal to the  five senses.
Background image of page 20
Cold, wet  leaves floating  on moss- colored water.
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 22
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 60

poetic terms 2 - POETICTERMS POETICTERMS EnglishIII...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 22. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online