RL-Nanoethics-5

RL-Nanoethics-5 - Application to Questions of Justice and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Application to Questions of Justice and Social Welfare: Conclusion Nanoethics Lecture V Roderick T. Long Auburn Dept. of Philosophy
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
John Locke (1632-1704) Natural Law theorist One of the chief inspirations of the American Revolution Essays on the Law of Nature (1664) Essay Concerning Toleration (1667) Two Treatises of Government (1689) Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)
Background image of page 2
John Locke (1632-1704) God’s will is the standard of morality But we don’t need divine revelation to discover his will We can figure it out by reason
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
John Locke (1632-1704) Specifically, we can infer God’s purposes for human beings from the way he made us Since God made us essentially rational and social beings, he must intend us to live lives centered around reason and sociability
Background image of page 4
John Locke (1632-1704) If God had intended humans to have dominion over other humans, he wouldn’t have given all humans the ability to think for themselves So God must intend for us all to have equal rights “Men are not made for one another’s uses.” (Ancestor of Kant’s imperative not to treat persons as mere means.)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
John Locke (1632-1704) Q: Does this apply to women too, or is this equality for men only? Locke : On the one hand, the existing subordination of women to men is the result of sin, not the decree of God On the other hand, one could plausibly defend such subordination by appeal to biological differences [In other words, Locke doesn’t give a straight answer – though later Lockeans would say yes, equality applies to both sexes]
Background image of page 6
John Locke (1632-1704) Locke’s conclusion: no one can legitimately exercise authority over you without your consent Further conclusion: governments must rest on consent of the governed, and may legitimately be overthrown if they overstep their authority
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Applying Locke’s Philosophy We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it – Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence , 1776
Background image of page 8
of Private Property? Robert Filmer, Locke’s archenemy, had argued that all property in the realm belonged rightfully to the King Your farm, your tools, the clothes on your back – it’s all the King’s property, so OBEY! To combat this, Locke needed to
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 40

RL-Nanoethics-5 - Application to Questions of Justice and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online