RL-Nanoethics-7b

RL-Nanoethics-7b - An Example from the Nanoscale:...

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An Example from the Nanoscale: Self-Assembly When orderly arrangements of particles take up less volume than random arrangements, compression results in self-ordering. (Richard Jones, Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life )
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An Example from the Nanoscale: Self-Assembly Analogy: suppose the most orderly arrangement of these oranges is also the one that takes up the least space
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An Example from the Nanoscale: Self-Assembly Then anything that compresses the oranges will tend (discounting friction, etc. ) to cause them to arrange themselves in the most orderly way
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An Example from the Nanoscale: Self-Assembly This capacity of the oranges is a “bottom-up” (in the systemic sense) feature, and can in principle occur without human intervention But the tendency can be exploited by “top-down” (again in the systemic sense) planning, by deliberately compressing the oranges Likewise, nanoscale self-assembly can be triggered by arranging the right conditions, as with this gold polymer (Northwestern U.)
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course PHIL 110 taught by Professor Markjones during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

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RL-Nanoethics-7b - An Example from the Nanoscale:...

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