Ch13 - Myers PSYCHOLOGY (6th Ed) Chapter13 Emotion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Myers’ PSYCHOLOGY (6th Ed) Chapter 13 Emotion James A. McCubbin, PhD Clemson University Worth Publishers
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Emotion Emotion a response of the  whole organism physiological arousal expressive behaviors conscious   experience
Background image of page 2
Theories of Emotion Does your heart pound  because you are afraid. ..    or are you afraid because you  feel your heart pounding?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
James-Lange Theory of Emotion Experience of emotion is awareness of   physiological responses to emotion-arousing  stimuli Fear (emotion) Pounding heart (arousal) Sight of oncoming car (perception of stimulus)
Background image of page 4
Cannon-Bard Theory of Emotion Emotion-arousing  stimuli simultaneously  trigger: physiological  responses  subjective experience  of emotion Sight of oncoming car (perception of stimulus) Pounding heart (arousal) Fear (emotion)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Schachter’s Two Factor Theory of Emotion To experience  emotion one  must: be physically  aroused  cognitively  label the  arousal Cognitive label “I’m afraid” Fear (emotion) Sight of oncoming car (perception of stimulus) Pounding heart (arousal)
Background image of page 6
Cognition and Emotion The brain’s shortcut for emotions
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Two Routes to Emotion Appraisal Event Emotional response Physiological activation Expressive behavior Subjective experience
Background image of page 8
Two Dimensions of Emotion Positive valence Negative valence High arousal Low arousal pleasant relaxation joy sadness fear anger
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Emotional Arousal Autonomic nervous system controls physiological arousal
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course PSYCH 210 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

Page1 / 29

Ch13 - Myers PSYCHOLOGY (6th Ed) Chapter13 Emotion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online