JobAttitudes

JobAttitudes - Industrial-Organizational Psychology...

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Prepared by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology - SIOP Industrial-Organizational Psychology Learning Module Job Attitudes
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Lesson Objectives Know what job attitudes are, and be familiar with the assumptions that underlie them. Be familiar with the role that social psychology has played in attitude research and theory development. Understand the relationship between attitudes and behavior, especially regarding performance on the job. Understand how I/O psychologists are helping companies to assess and manage job attitudes and their impact on organizational performance. Prepared by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology - SIOP At the end of this lecture, you should:
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Attitudes Defined Briefly defined, an “attitude” represents a predisposition to respond in a favorable or unfavorable way to persons or objects in one’s environment. For instance, when we say we “like” something or “dislike” something, we are in effect expressing an attitude toward the person or object. What are some examples of people or things that you may have strong attitudes about?
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Attitudes: Three Important Assumptions Three important assumptions underlie the concept of attitudes: 1) An attitude is a hypothetical construct - we cannot actually see attitudes, although we can often see their consequences. 2) An attitude is a unidimensional construct - it usually ranges from very positive to very negative. 3) Attitudes are believed to be somewhat related to subsequent behavior, although as we’ll see, this relationship can be unclear. Prepared by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology - SIOP
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Social Psychology and Attitude Research I Attitude has been a central concept in social psychology throughout its history. An attitude is one of many constructs that social psychologists have invoked to help explain consistencies and differences in behavior. For example, if person A responds favorably toward a particular national group and person B responds unfavorably toward that same group, the differences in behaviors can be “explained” by attributing different attitudes toward the two persons.
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Social Psychology and Attitude Research II Beginning in the 1950’s, social psychologists studied areas such as: How attitudes are formed. How attitudes are changed.
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course PSYCH 210 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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JobAttitudes - Industrial-Organizational Psychology...

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