Lab 4 - Prokayotic Diversity B - Student

Lab 4 - Prokayotic Diversity B - Student - BSC2011 Lab 4...

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1 Although structurally simple, prokaryotes may be the most diverse group of organisms on Earth, and are certainly the most numerous on Earth. Prokaryotes have been here for billions of years and more prokaryote individuals exist in a single handful of soil than humans that have ever lived. Most prokaryotes have nothing to do with humans, but those that do are globally important to us. All prokaryotes lack membrane-bound organelles: their DNA exists as one large, circular molecule suspended within the cytoplasm, and they only reproduce asexually via binary fission (cell division), though plasmids can also exchange DNA among cells. It helps to think of prokaryotes as chemically-diverse, because they are structurally simple and similar. Prokaryotes make up two of the three Domains; Archaea and Bacteria , which differ in traits such as membrane structure and the machinery of transcription and translation. Archaea are found in many of the same places as Bacteria, but also inhabit extreme environments, such as hot springs. Many of the commonly known prokaryotes are in the
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BSC 2011C taught by Professor Klowden/crampton during the Fall '11 term at University of Central Florida.

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Lab 4 - Prokayotic Diversity B - Student - BSC2011 Lab 4...

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