Lab Report Appendix_Student1

Lab Report Appendix_Student1 - BSC2011 Lab Report Appendix...

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A - 1 It is very important to be able to communicate scientific information to other scientists and to the general public. Thus, you are required to write a laboratory report during the course of this semester. Described below is the required format and required sections for all scientific papers. Failure to include the required format and sections in your lab report will result in a 0% for this assignment. All reports must have the following format or the report will NOT be graded: Typed 12 point font (preferably Times Roman) Double spaced All reports must include the following sections (or report will NOT be graded): Introduction Methods Results Discussion Literature Cited (the lab manual, your textbook, and at least 2 peer reviewed journals) Figures Table Title Page The title page should include: The title of the report (this must be different from the title in the lab manual) Your name BSC 2011 Your lab section number Date you are turning in your manuscript (this should change for each draft you turn in) See Figure 1 for an example of a title page BSC2011 Lab Report Appendix A “how to” guide
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Bsc2011 Appendix A – Writing a Lab Report A - 2 Microbial Diversity Student Name BSC 2011 Section # Date Figure 1 : Example of Title Page Introduction The purpose of your Introduction is to present the reader with the concepts and information necessary to understand your experiment. This will in part be accomplished by briefly summarizing any previous work (e.g. from the primary literature) associated with your topic. An effective introduction begins with broad statements that include enough background
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Bsc2011 Appendix A – Writing a Lab Report A - 3 information to “set the stage” for your experiment. In other words, start broadly but only discuss things that are significant to your specific question. For instance, if your experiment is examining the diversity of trees within a forest, you might want to discuss why diversity is important and the role that it may play within an ecosystem. After opening your paper with a broad introduction to the topic, introduce the system you are using to explore this topic. Discuss why the system you chose is appropriate for examining your particular topic. For instance, after discussing the importance and role of diversity within an ecosystem, narrow down to the forest ecosystem (your topic) and discuss why the forest is appropriate for examining different levels of diversity. To narrow even further, you should select a specific question that you will explore within your paper. Using the forest example, an appropriate question might be “Do small forest fragments have lower species diversity (e.g., fewer tree species) than large fragments?” or “Does the species diversity differ in a tropical rainforest versus a pine forest?” Then use this specific question to frame the remainder of your paper and hypotheses. A hypothesis is a tentative and falsifiable explanation for an observation, phenomenon or
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Lab Report Appendix_Student1 - BSC2011 Lab Report Appendix...

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