Ethics I Aristotle Hobbes

Ethics I Aristotle Hobbes - ETHICS The Branch of Philosophy...

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ETHICS The Branch of Philosophy Concerned With Human Choice and Action
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The Virtue Ethics of Aristotle from The Nicomachea n Ethics
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Aristotle’s Teleological Understanding of Nature Just as the telos of an acorn is to grow into an oak tree, so all living things have an inner telos , a state at which they aim in their development. When conditions are favorable and the telos is being fully expressed, those organisms are said to be in a state of flourishing .
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Book I Ch. 1, 402a 1-7 Book I, Ch. 5, 411b 228-31 Book II, Ch. 1, 412a 29-30 Book II, Ch. 1, 412b 4-10 From Aristotle’s
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Aristotle is in search of The Supreme Good, that for the sake of which all else is done . . . . . . This is that at which we are to aim, like archers at a target.
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For Aristotle, Ethics is a branch of Politics—the science of seeking the good of a human group, fulfilling the telos of a flourishing human society. ( the above is actually from The Politics )
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In his quest, Aristotle considers several possible candidates for “the Good,” but dismisses all that are only useful as a means to something else. Money-making is ruled out right away as not being the Good that we are seeking.
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Happiness is finally discovered to be the Supreme Good, but the Greek idea indicated something considerably broader than our English word. Happiness as EUDAIMONI A
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The very broad, functional notion of “happiness” that Aristotle termed Eudaimonia can be visualized metaphorically in the form of a gyroscope spinning upright. The image conveys a sense of constantly ongoing activity, which Aristotle emphasizes, and which can be extended to represent as well the essential life-maintaining processes of organisms other than the human. The virtue of Justice is other-regarding, but many of the Aristotelian virtues appear, at first glance, primarily self-regarding, aimed toward optimizing the health and welfare of the moral agent. When seen in the context of a well-
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Ethics I Aristotle Hobbes - ETHICS The Branch of Philosophy...

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