chapter34 and 35 - stems, roots and transport

chapter34 and 35 - stems, roots and transport - phloem

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Chapters 34, 35 Stems perform three main functions in plants: support leaves and reproductive structures, produce new living tissue, and maintain a vascular system that is continuous from roots to stems, through leaves and reproductive structures
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Monocot Eudicot Corn Stem (monocot) Sunflower (eudicot)
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Primary tissue growth Secondary tissue growth
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Water and dissolved minerals move from soil into root tissues (epidermis, cortex )……………………………………………………. .
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Fig 34-10: NB: cuticle
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Guttation on a Equisetum fluviatile by Luc ViatourGFDL Guttation [General] Wayne - [email protected] prings.com
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Leaf xylem TRANSPIRATION ( GUTTATION) Stem xylem Root Xylem ROOT Water moves into root cells by diffusion; mineral ions by active transport SOIL TENSION (TRANSPIRATION)- COHESION MODEL** Rf: Fig 35-11 ROOT PRESSURE
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Dissolved sugar (predominantly sucrose) is translocated both upward and downward in
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Unformatted text preview: phloem :………………………………. . Leaf phloem Leaf xylem Stem phloem Root phloem Root xylem PHOTOSYNTHESIS sucrose ATP source amyloplast Turgor Pressure HIGH Turgor Pressure LOW UNLOADING ATP water water Fig. 35-12 XYLEM PHLOEM Companion cell Sieve tube element Direction of water movement Direction of sucrose movement Vessel running through length of plant Sieve tube running through length of plant At SOURCE (Leaf cell) Sucrose actively loaded into sieve tube elements (requires ATP). Water diffuses from xylem as a result of decreased (more negative) water potential in sieve tube. At SINK (Root cell) Sucrose actively and passively unloaded into sink cell, such as parenchyma cell in the root cortex. (Active unloading requires ATP.) Water diffuses from phloem to xylem as a result of increased (less negative) water potential in sieve tube....
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Martin during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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chapter34 and 35 - stems, roots and transport - phloem

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