An idiom is a particular word or expression whose meaning cannot be readily understood by either its

An idiom is a particular word or expression whose meaning cannot be readily understood by either its

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An idiom is a particular word or expression whose meaning cannot be readily  understood by either its grammar or the words used. Idiomatic expressions cannot be  translated word for word without causing confusion. For example, when combined with  an adverb that describes feeling or health,  aller  (to go) is used to describe a person's  health:  Je vais bien . (I feel fine. I'm fine.)  Although the verb “to be” is used in English to refer to certain physical conditions, in 
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Unformatted text preview: French you express the same thought by combining the verb avoir (to have) with a noun: • avoir … ans (to be … years old) • avoir l'air (to appear) • avoir besoin de (to need) • avoir chaud (to be hot) • avoir de la chance (to be lucky) • avoir froid (to be cold) • avoir envie de (to feel like, to want)...
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course FR 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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